Category Archives: Relationships

The One Anothers of Scripture (INFOGRAPHIC)


One Anothers of ScriptureHere’s a visual that shows all the “one anothers” that I was able to find in the Scriptures, e.g, “love one another,” “forgive one another” and so on.  The size of each of the keywords to the left of the Scriptures indicates the relative number of times it appears in the Bible.

You can find the slide to download on the Lesson and Material Downloads page.  It is listed alphabetically as “One Anothers of Scripture, The (INFOGRAPHIC).”

You can use this resource in a variety of ways:

  • Assign a few “one another” topics to individual or groups, and have them read the associated Scriptures.  Have them share about the context in which each “one another” was given.
  • Have a discussion about the large number of “one anothers” in the New Testament.  Why are there so many? What are the implications for us as Christians?  How well are we doing?
  • Use the list of “one anothers” as a self-assessment.  In which areas are you (or your participants) doing well? In which areas could you improve?
  • Compare the number of times each of the “one anothers” appears in Scripture.  What messages should we take away from this?  How should this affect our behaviors?
  • Ask participants to group the “one anothers” into major themes.  What do they learn from this exercise?

 

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Body of Christ, Love, Oneness, Relationships, teambuilding, unity

Team Member Highs and Lows (ACTIVITY)


Thumbs Up and DownTime

30-90 minutes (depending on team size and sharing times)
Description

This activity is a great way for teams to connect when they haven’t met for some time.  Each member shares their “high” (best experience) and “low” (worst experience) since the last time the team was together.  After each person shares, you might want to have another team member pray for that individual.

 

NOTE:  This activity can get very emotional.  Have a box of tissues available.  Also, if you don’t set clear guidelines at the beginning regarding how long people should share, it will be difficult to do it later if you notice you are going over time.

 

Audience

Children, youth, adults

 

Materials

  • None

 

Preparation

  • None

 

Procedure

Use the following script (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “Since we haven’t been together for some time, I would like for us to spend some time sharing about our personal highlights and struggles.”
  • “We are going to go around the room, and each person with share their ‘high’ (best experience) and ‘low’ (worst experience) since the last time the team was together.”
  • “While they are sharing, I ask that everyone just listen carefully.”
    “Once they are done, I would like to ask for someone from the group to pray for that person.”
  • “We have _______ minutes for this activity, so I would like to ask each person to try to keep your sharing to ________ minutes or less.”
  • “I’ll go first so that you can hear what I mean by highs and lows.”  (Be the first person to share.  It’s important that you model the type of sharing you want from the group.  If you share something superficial, most of the others will probably do the same.  But if you disclose something meaningful, many others will feel comfortable doing the same.)

Leave a comment

Filed under Icebreaker, prayer, Relationships, teambuilding

Wreck-It Ralph (MOVIE MENTORING)


Wreck It RalphAudience

Children

Time

3 hours
Description

Wreck-It Ralph is a movie from Disney about a video game villain who wants to be a hero.  It deals with themes of diversity, judgment, bullying and self-acceptance.  It can be a good way to teach children how to appreciate the differences in the others around them.

 

Scriptures

These Scriptures speak to some of the themes of the movie.  Read one or more to give a biblical basis for the teaching.

  • Micah 6:8 (do justice, love kindness, walk humbly)
  • Matthew 7:1-5 (do not judge; remove the plank in your own eye first)
  • Matthew 7:12 (do to others as you would have them do to you)
  • Mark 12:31 (love your neighbor as yourself)
  • 1 Peter 3:8-9 (love one another, be compassionate and humble, repay evil with a blessing)

 

Materials

o  Copy of the movie

o  Equipment for showing the movie (TV, DVD player, LCD projector, Speakers, Screen…)

o  Question Sheet (attached)

o  Popcorn and drinks (optional)

 

Preparation

o  Print out copies of the question sheet for each individual or group.

o  Set up everything for viewing the movie.  (Be sure to test it all out to make sure that the movie plays well and that the sound can be heard by everyone.)

o  Prepare snacks. (optional)

 

Procedure

Watch the movie.  Then on your own, with a mentor or with a group, answer the questions on the Question Sheet.

 

Question Sheet

 

  1. Why didn’t the townspeople let Ralph live with them or participate in their activities?
  2. Are there people in our own community who get treated like Ralph?  Why or why not?
  3. How do you think the townspeople should have treated Ralph?
  4. In the “Bad-anon” meeting, the video game villains said that you can’t change if you’re a bad guy.  Do you think this is true?  Why or why not?
  5. Do you think Ralph had a good reason for wanting to earn a medal?  Why or why not?
  6. How do you feel about the way all the other racers treated Vanellope (“the Glitch”)?
  7. What is similar about Vanellope and Ralph?
  8. How did the thing that made them different from everyone else become the greatest strengths for Ralph and Vanellope?
  9. What did the townspeople and the other racers learn about how to treat someone who is different?
  10. How should we treat people in our lives who are different from everyone else?

 

Leave a comment

Filed under acceptance, Agape Love, Bullying, diversity, Judgment, Justice, Kindness, Love, Movie, Relationships

Restored (GAME)


Time

15-20 minutes
Description

Peter denied knowing Jesus three times.  After Jesus rose from the dead, he reinstated Peter to leadership of the church by giving him three opportunities to express his love for Jesus.  In this activity, children will try to knock down three cans labeled, “I don’t know him!” with beanbags or balls labeled, “Yes, Lord, you know I love you!”

 

Scriptures

  • John 18:15-18
  • John 18:25-27
  • John 21:15-17

 

Materials

  • 3 canned foods labeled, “I don’t know him!”
  • 3 beanbags or balls labeled, “Yes, Lord, you know I love you!”
  • Note cards or duct tape to use to label the cans and the beanbags/balls.
  • 1 permanent marker for labeling
  • 1 surface (like a overturned bucket or table) to set the cans on
  • Masking tape
  • Bible

 

Preparation

  • Label the cans of food and the beanbags or balls.
  • Select a space to play the game.
  • Stack the three cans (two on the bottom and one on the top) on the bucket or table.
  • Use the masking tape to lay down a “throwing line” about ten feet away from the cans. (The children will stand behind this line to make their throws.)
  • Practice the script.

 

Procedure

Use the following script (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “We’re going to play a game called, ‘Restored.’”
  • “It’s about Jesus and Peter.”
  • “Peter told Jesus one time that even if everyone else left Him, he never would.”
  • “Peter even carried around a sword in case he needed to defend Jesus against an attacker.”
  • “But one night, the Jewish leaders sent their guards to arrest Jesus.”
  • “Peter attacked with his sword, but he hurt a servant instead of the guards.”
  • “Jesus healed the man that Peter had cut and then let the guards arrest Him.”
  • “Peter and all of Jesus’ best friends got scared and ran away.”
  • “Peter followed the guards from a distance as they took Jesus to the Jewish leaders.”
  • “The guards took Jesus to the house of the top Jewish leader and put Him on trial for crimes He didn’t commit.”
  • “Peter waited in the courtyard while the trial was going on, and people started to notice that he looked like one of Jesus’ followers.”
  • “They asked him three times if he was one of Jesus’ followers, and he denied it each time.”
  • “Jesus wasn’t surprised, though.”
  • “He had told Peter that he would deny knowing Jesus three times before the rooster crowed.”
  • “Sure enough, when Peter denied he knew Jesus for the third time, a rooster crowed, and Jesus looked directly into Peter’s eyes.”
  • “Peter was so ashamed that he ran away and cried and cried.”
  • “When Jesus needed Peter the most, Peter wasn’t a very good friend.”
  • “But even though Peter wasn’t a very good friend to Jesus, Jesus still wanted Peter to lead His followers.”
  • “After Jesus rose from the dead, He met with Peter to let him know that he was forgiven.”
  • “Then, one morning, Jesus did a strange thing.”
  • “He asked Peter three times if Peter loved Him.”  (Have volunteer read John 21:15-17.)
  • “By asking Peter this question three times, Jesus was letting him know that Peter was forgiven and restored to a leadership position for Jesus’ followers.”
  • “Each ‘I love you, Lord,’ was like a big eraser getting rid of the ‘I don’t know Hims!.’”
  • “So, this game is like the Bible story.”
  • “Each of these cans is labeled, ‘I don’t know him!’ and represents the three times Peter denied knowing Jesus after Jesus had been arrested.”
  • “Each bean bag (or ball) is labeled, ‘Yes, Lord, you know I love you!’ and represents the three times Peter was given a chance to express his love to Jesus after Jesus rose from the dead.”
  • “Everyone will take turns throwing three bean bags (or balls) at the cans from a distance of about ten (10) feet.”
  • “If you knock the cans down, it will be like erasing Peter’s denials with his confessions of love for Jesus.”
  • “Want to play?”  (Let the children line up and take turns trying to knock over the cans.  Each child gets three throws before you reset the cans for the next child.  After each child has had at least one chance to knock the cans over, discuss the following debrief questions.)

 

Debrief Questions

  1. How do you think Peter felt after denying Jesus three times?
  2. Do you remember why Jesus asked Peter, “Do you love me?” three times?  Why did He do that?
  3. How do you think Peter felt after Jesus gave him three chances to confess his love for Jesus?
  4. Do you believe God forgives you for every bad thing you do?  Why or why not?

2 Comments

Filed under Church, forgiveness, Game, Grace, Jesus, leadership, Peter, Relationships

Conflict Wheel (BIBLICAL CASE STUDY)


Description

This Biblical Case Study uses Sherrod Miller’s* “Information Wheel” to explore the conflict between Paul and Peter in 2 Galatians.  Participants will gain a deeper understanding of how to use the Wheel as they reflect on both Peter’s and Paul’s perspectives.

Materials: You can download the worksheet for this Biblical Case Study at http://www.teachingthem.com on the Lesson and Material Downloads page.  The file is named, “Conflict Wheel Form (Biblical Case Study).”

Explanation of the Wheel

Issue: Write down what the conflict is about.

What did you observe? Write down any facts about the Issue.  What did you see?  What did you hear?  Avoid opinions at this point.

What do you think about it? Write down your opinions about what you observed.

How do you feel about it? Write down any emotions you experienced as a result of what you thought about what happened.

What do you want for Stakeholders, Self, Others, Ministry? Think about each of these people groups, and write down what you want for them.  Stakeholders includes anyone who has a vested interest in the outcome of the conflict. Self is you.  What do you want or need? Others includes the other parties in the conflict. Ministry includes the team or the larger organization.  If you work for a secular organization, you can substitute Business.

What did / will you do? What did you do in the past related to this conflict?  What will you do now?  What will you do in the future?

Assignment:

Read Galatians 2:11-21.  Putting yourself in the position of Paul, fill in the Conflict Wheel to analyze how Paul might have reflected on the conflict immediately after it happened.  Fill in what you know from the Scriptures, but feel free to make up the rest based on what you know about Paul.

——————

Now put yourself in the position of Peter (“Cephas”), and fill in the Conflict Wheel to analyze how Peter might have reflected on the conflict immediately after it happened.  You will have to make up most of the information based on what you know about Peter.

——–

When everyone in your group is finished looking at the conflict from both points of view, discuss any insights you gained from using the “Information Wheel.”

* You can contact Sherrod Miller and learn more about “The Information Wheel” at Interpersonal Communication Programs, Inc., Evergreen, CO 80439 – PH 800-328-5099

Leave a comment

Filed under Biblical Case Study, conflict management, Conflict Resolution, Paul, Peter, Relationships

Conflict Escalation – David (BIBLICAL CASE STUDY)


Read the story of David’s war with his son Absalom in 2 Samuel and try to determine the events that relate to the Five Stages of Escalating Conflict.  When you think you have them all identified (hint: some occur multiple times), draw a graph on a flip chart, and label it with these events to show the 5 Stages.

The Scriptures you will want to focus on are: 2 Samuel 13:1-39; 14:21-33; 15:1-17; 18:1-17

 Environment

  • Conditions for conflict exist, but neither party has acted on them.
  • One side may even be unaware of the potential conflict even though the other side is resentful.

Eruption

  • A triggering event (or events) leads to escalation of the conflict by adding fuel to the fire.

Escalation

  • Intensified behaviors include demands, threats, ultimatums and open expressions of hostility.
  • Polarization occurs as people pick sides.
  • Opponents are dehumanized to make it easier to see them as the enemy, and selective perception filters out evidence that might justify opponents’ behaviors.
  • Fighting generates new grievances, sometimes becoming new triggering events.
  • Goals often change as initial solutions no longer satisfy.
  • Unresolved old issues are revived.

Endurance

  • Sides “dig in” for prolonged conflict.
  • Compromise seen as a sign of weakness.

End Point

  • Stalemate occurs as sides run out of resources, support or energy to continue.
  • Realization occurs that cost of conflict outweighs benefits of winning.
  • One side achieves a lasting victory.

Leave a comment

Filed under Biblical Case Study, conflict management, Conflict Resolution, David, Devotion, Relationships

Conflict Escalation – Samson (BIBLICAL CASE STUDY)


Read the story of Samson in Judges 14-16, and try to determine the events that relate to the Five Stages of Escalating Conflict.  When you think you have them all identified (hint: some occur multiple times), draw a graph on a flip chart, and label it with these events to show the Five Stages.

Environment

  • Conditions for conflict exist, but neither party has acted on them.
  • One side may even be unaware of the potential conflict even though the other side is resentful.

Eruption

  • A triggering event (or events) leads to escalation of the conflict by adding fuel to the fire.

Escalation

  • Intensified behaviors include demands, threats, ultimatums and open expressions of hostility.
  • Polarization occurs as people pick sides.
  • Opponents are dehumanized to make it easier to see them as the enemy, and selective perception filters out evidence that might justify opponents’ behaviors.
  • Fighting generates new grievances, sometimes becoming new triggering events.
  • Goals often change as initial solutions no longer satisfy.
  • Unresolved old issues are revived.

Endurance

  • Sides “dig in” for prolonged conflict.
  • Compromise seen as a sign of weakness.

End Point

  • Stalemate occurs as sides run out of resources, support or energy to continue.
  • Realization occurs that cost of conflict outweighs benefits of winning.
  • One side achieves a lasting victory.

Leave a comment

Filed under Biblical Case Study, conflict management, Conflict Resolution, Relationships, Samson