Category Archives: Object Lesson

How David Saw God (OBJ LESSON)


Holy OneTime

20 minutes
Description

This object lesson teaches about all the different ways David saw God.  It uses all the Davidic psalms and captures the metaphors he used for God in them.  Participants will explore the different metaphors and make buttons representing their favorite image of God.

 

Audience

Children, Youth, Adults

 

Materials

o  You can find all the following documents on the Lesson and Material Downloads page at www.teachingthem.com .

o   A copy of the document “How David Saw God – Instructions and Poster” (1 copy in color)

o   Several copies of the document “How David Saw God – Button Images” (enough copies for each participant to have a choice about which button they want to make – in color)

o  A copy of the document “David’s Metaphors for God” quick reference guide at the end of this lesson (1 copy for the facilitator)\

o  Posterboard – 1 sheet, white

o  Glue

o  Scissors

o  2.25” button maker and supplies (available from Badge-A-Minit – http://www.badgeaminit.com/ )  Purchase enough button supplies for the size of your group.

o  Bible

 

Scriptures

o  Psalms 3, 7, 9, 11, 13-14, 16, 18, 20-25, 27-31, 35, 36-38, 40, 51-52, 54, 57, 59, 61-64, 68, 70, 124, 140, 142-145

 

Preparation

o  Print out one copy of the document, “How David Saw God – Instructions and Poster” (in color).

o   Cut around the borders of the frame and the letters.

o   Paste the images to a piece of posterboard or foam board.

o  Print out one copy of the document “David’s Metaphors for God” at the end of this lesson.

o  Print out several copies of the document “How David Saw God – Button Images” (several copies in color – you want enough copies for participants to have a choice about which button they will make)

o  Watch the training video “Make a Button with Badge a Minit Button Maker” at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=amRRBNYy-Zs

o  Practice the script.

Procedure

Use the following script and instructions (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “The Bible tells us that David was a man after God’s own heart.”
  • “This means that David had a really close relationship with God.”
  • “Throughout his life, David wrote songs to worship God.”
  • “We have these saved in the Bible in the book of Psalms.”
  • “If we look at all the Psalms that David wrote (74 in all), we see the many ways David saw God.”
  • “David liked to use picture words to represent a part of God’s nature.”
  • “God is so much more than any one image, but when you put them all together, you get a really good picture of what God is like.”  (Point out how the images on the poster all combine to make the word “GOD.”)
  • “Take a look at this poster, and pick one of the images you would like to know more about.”  (Allow participants to select different images.  Use the “David’s Metaphors for God” document to give them more information about that image.  Feel free to summarize what is on the document.  You don’t have to share it all.  When everyone has asked about all the images they want more information about, let them choose one image to make into a button.  Follow the instructions on the YouTube video to make the buttons.)
  • Review the Rhyme Time below to reinforce the main message of the lesson.

 

Rhyme Time

David saw God in many ways

And used each one to give Him praise.

 

Source: Michael Kientz

 

 

David’s Metaphors for God

David used the following metaphors to describe God in his Psalms.  The number beside each metaphor designates Psalms in which they are present.

 

Metaphor Psalms Meaning
Cup 16 David had been chased away from Jerusalem, where he daily ate at the king’s table.  The king provided his meals and drink (his “cup”) for him.  When he wrote this psalm, David was hiding from Saul and didn’t know from where his next meal was coming.  However, he knew that God would supply everything he needed.  Cup also refers to God’s plan for someone’s life.   In it are both blessings and sorrows, and each person must decide if he will “drink it” (obey God) or not (just like when Jesus asked the Father to “take this cup from me” as in Luke 22:42).
Deliverer 18, 40, 70, 140, 144 David faced many dangerous situations as he ran from King Saul, but God delivered (saved) him from every one.  In the Psalms, David says God delivered him from the attacks of people, from those who wanted to take his life and from evil doers.
Fortress (a.k.a., Strong Fortress, Fortress of Salvation) 18, 28, 31, 59, 62, 144 A fortress is a military stronghold.  When King Saul chased David into the desert, David had to hide in caves.  He didn’t have a secure fortress, but he trusted in God and knew that God’s protection was better than any fortress on earth.
Glory 3 David was given glory every time he fought and won an impressive battle.  He received glory when he killed Goliath and when he defeated the Philistines time after time.  The woman sang songs about how Saul had killed his thousands but David had killed his tens of thousands.  But David knew that the true glory belonged to God.  David knew that he couldn’t have won those battles without God.
Help 30, 40, 54, 70 Whenever David found himself in a dangerous situation, God helped him.  When David fought Goliath, God helped him.  When Saul threatened David’s life, God helped him.  God was always there whenever David needed him.
Holy One 22 The word “holy” means spiritually perfect.  David knew that God is the only one who is holy and worthy of our praises.
Horn of My Salvation 18 In the Bible, God told the Israelites to blow a ram’s horn (a shofar) whenever they went into battle, and He would save them from their enemies (Num 10:9)  The Bible also tells us that a horn will blow when Jesus returns to earth to start His reign.
Judge (a.k.a., Righteous Judge) 9 David was being judged by a bad king (Saul), but he knew that God is a righteous Judge who would give him justice in the end.
King (a.k.a., King of Glory) 9, 11, 24, 29, 68, 145 David was a good and powerful king, but he still bowed his knee to a better King, King Jesus – the King of Glory.
Light 27 Light pushes back darkness.  It brings hope and makes things clear.  David knew that God was the true Light, the One who had led the Israelites out of Egypt in a pillar of fire.  The Bible also tells us that Jesus is the light of the world and that anyone who follows Him will never walk in darkness (John 8:12).
Living Water (implied but not explicit) 63, 143 David spent a lot of time in the desert running from King Saul, and he and his men were thirsty a lot. Even in a dry land, David thirsted for God more than water.  Jesus also tells us that He gives us living water (His Word and His Spirit) and that anyone who drinks it will never be thirsty again (John 4:10).
Maker of Heaven and Earth 124 David recognized that God is the Creator of the entire universe.
Portion 16, 142 A “portion” to Hebrew people is their inheritance.  In other words, it’s the amount a son receives from his father when the father dies.  King Saul chased David away from Jerusalem and the kingdom, because he didn’t want David to become king after him.  King Saul thought he could keep David from receiving the kingdom (his inheritance) after him, but David knew that his real inheritance (his portion) came from God.  David didn’t want earthly treasure.  He wanted a relationship with God.
Redeemer 20 A redeemer is someone who pays what someone owes.  In David’s time, people who couldn’t pay their debts might become slaves to someone else, but a redeemer could pay to get them out of slavery.  David knew that his sins put him into debt with Satan but that God would pay to buy him back.  Jesus is our Redeemer, because He paid for our sins on the cross.
Refuge 9, 14, 31, 59, 61, 62, 142 A refuge is a safe place to hide.  David spent a lot of time running for his life and living in hidden caves, but he saw God as the safest place to hide.
Rock 18, 20, 28, 31, 61, 62, 144 David hid in a lot of rock caves, and he knew they were a safe place that he could depend on.  He thought about God as his safe place to hide.  The Bible also tells us that Jesus is our Rock (1 Cor 10).
Salvation (a.k.a., Horn of My Salvation) 18, 27, 35, 62 David spent years running for his life, but he had faith that God would save him from every trouble.  He trusted in God to be his salvation.  Jesus is our salvation, and everyone who believes in Him will have everlasting life (John 3:16).
Savior 18, 24, 25, 38, 51, 68 God saved David time after time when King Saul tried to kill him.  Jesus is our Savior, and His name even means, “God saves.”  Everyone who believes in Jesus will have everlasting life with God in heaven (John 3:16).
Shepherd 23, 28 David was a shepherd for many years when he was a boy, and he knew how important it was for a shepherd to love his flock.  David saw God as a loving Shepherd, who took really good care of his sheep.  Jesus told us that He is the Good Shepherd (John 10:11).
Shield 3, 7, 18, 28, 59, 140, 144 David was a warrior, and he knew the value of a good shield.  Shields protect you from an attack and provide a good defense.  David saw God as his best defense against his enemy.
Strength 18, 22, 28, 59 When David felt weak, he trusted in God to be his strength, and strength is really important to a warrior.
Stronghold 9, 18, 27, 37, 52, 144 A stronghold is a place an army has built up to make it strong against attack.  David felt that he was safe from any attack, because God would protect him.
Tower (a.k.a., Strong Tower) 61 Castles have towers, because towers make it possible to see your enemy from far away.  David called God his strong tower, because God protected him from all his enemies.
Warrior (implied but not explicit) 7, 13, 18, 21, 35, 38, 64, 144 David was a warrior, but he saw God as the most powerful warrior, able to come to his defense against any enemy.
Wings (a.k.a., Wings of Refuge) 36, 57, 61, 63 A mother bird covers her children with her wings to protect them.  When David compared God to wings, he was thinking of God’s protection every time David was in trouble.

 

 

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Filed under David, Object Lesson, Praise

Don’t Take Shortcuts (OBJ LESSON)


MazeTime

20 minutes
Description

This object lesson teaches about what we miss out on when we take shortcuts in reaching God’s will for our life.  It uses a maze and the life of David.

 

Audience

Children

 

Materials

o  PowerPoint file – “Don’t Take Shortcuts – Maze  (You can find this on the Lesson and Material Downloads page at www.teachingthem.com.)  Make one copy for each participant.  The file also includes answer keys with three different paths.  You might want to print one copy of these for your reference.

o  Pens or pencils to work the maze.  (One per participant)

o  A package of gummy fruit for each participant.

o  Bible

 

Scriptures

o  1 Samuel 16:1, 11-13

o  1 Samuel 24:1-7

o  1 Samuel 26:1-25

 

Preparation

o  Print copies of the maze for each participant.

o  Practice the script.

Procedure

Use the following script and instructions (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “When we know what God’s will is for our life, we sometimes want to take shortcuts.”
  • “David knew God’s will for his life from an early age – maybe from about fifteen years old.”  (Have participant read 1 Samuel 16:1, 11-13.)
  • “If you knew that God wanted you to be king, you might want to make that happen as fast as possible.”
  • “However, David was different.”
  • “He didn’t want God’s will for him until God wanted him to have it.”
  • “Even though God had Samuel tell David he would be king of Israel some day, David let King Saul chase him around the desert for fifteen years.”
  • “David had two opportunities to kill King Saul.”  (Have volunteer read 1 Samuel 24:1-7 and then summarize the story from 1 Samuel 26:1-25.)
  • “David didn’t kill Saul either time, because he didn’t want God’s will for his life until it was God’s time.”
  • “That was smart, because it helped David grow more like God as he waited.”
  • “When he was finally made king fifteen years after he was anointed to be king, he was ready!”
  • “Let’s do a maze that will help you see what I’m talking about.”  (Pass out copies of the maze to each participant.  Hand out a package of gummy fruit to each participant, and tell them that they can eat a gummy candy anytime they cross a picture on the maze.  Give them 5 minutes to try and solve it.  Let them know that the rules are that they can’t cross lines or go over the same space twice.  There are three possible solutions (shown in the PowerPoint file).  When they finish, debrief with the following questions:
    • Why do you think it is better to take the harder path?
    • What do you miss if you take the short-cut?
    • Why does God want you to be patient and wait for His will for your life?
  • Review the Rhyme Time below to reinforce the main message of the lesson.)

 

Rhyme Time

It may be a test,

But we should wait for God’s best!

 

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Filed under David, God's Will, King Saul, Obedience, Object Lesson

Solid Foundation (OBJ LESSON)


Building with LegosTime

20 minutes
Description

When you are building a house, it’s essential to have a strong foundation.  Jesus illustrated this in the parable about the wise and foolish builders and made it clear that the “house” is a metaphor for our life.  If we build on the Rock (Jesus), our lives will withstand every storm of life.  In this object lesson, children will build three different foundations and then test them to see if they will stand the test.

 

Scriptures

  • Luke 6:46-49

 

Materials

  • Sugar cubes (1 box per group – make sure they are fresh so that they will dissolve quickly in water)
  • Marshmallows (1 bag of large marshmallows per group)
  • Legos or Duplo building blocks (about 100 small blocks or 50 large blocks per group)
  • A small house made from half of the Lego’s or Duplo blocks
  • Watering can or 3 bottles of water
  • Water (enough to fill you can or bottle)
  • Clear plastic containers (3  – about 8-10 inches tall and large enough for kids to build their foundations in)
  • Bible

 

Preparation

  • Build a small house out of the Legos or Duplo blocks, but save about half of your blocks for building one of the foundations.
  • Put the sugar cubes in one plastic container, the marshmallows in another and the rest of the Legos or Duplo blocks in another.
  • Fill the watering can with water (if you are using one)
    • Practice the script.

 

Procedure

Use the following script (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “Jesus told a story about a wise and a foolish builder.”  (Have a volunteer read Luke 6:46-49.)
  • “Jesus isn’t really talking about houses.  He’s talking about something much more important.  When He says ‘house,’ He really means life.”
  • “Jesus is saying that we should build our life on a strong foundation so that when bad things happen (like the flood and the torrent, which is a fast-moving stream), our house – our life – will not be destroyed.”
  • “So what is this foundation that Jesus is speaking about?  Does anyone know?” (Acknowledge responses.)
  • “In Scripture, the term ‘foundation’ is often used to mean truth.”
  • “In the story Jesus told, He said that the wise builder dug down deep and laid his foundation on the rock.”
  • “In the Bible, rocks are usually references to Jesus, the Rock.”
  • “So, what Jesus was saying is that the wise builder built his life (his ‘house’) on the truth (the ‘foundation’) that Jesus (‘the Rock’) is Lord and Savior.”
  • “If you build your life on any other foundation, it won’t stand up during the storms of life – the difficult times.”
  • “Let’s do an activity that will show what Jesus means.”  (Divide the group into three small groups, and give each group a container with different building materials. Give them 3 minutes to build a foundation out of their materials.  When everyone is finished, set the small house on top of the sugar cubes.)
  •  “Let’s see what happens when the storms of life happen to a house built on this kind of foundation.”  (Get a volunteer to poor water over the house to simulate a storm and flood.)
  • “What is happening to this foundation?” (Acknowledge responses.  Get another volunteer to shake the plastic container to simulate an earthquake.)
  • “Now what’s happening?” (Acknowledge response. Repeat the process for the marshmallow and Lego/Duplo foundation, but when you put the house on the Lego/Duplo foundation, attach it so that it sits firmly and will withstand the “earthquake.”  After you’ve finished the activity, discuss the Debrief questions below.  You can use the Rhyme Time to reinforce the main teaching point.)

 

Debriefing Questions

 

  1. If the Legos/Duplo blocks represent the Truth that Jesus is Lord and Savior, what do you think the sugar cubes and marshmallows represented?  (An answer that you are looking for is that they represent what the world says is true.  These are fake truths.)
  2. What are some examples of fake truths that some people build their lives on?  (Some responses might include “money, power, fame, pleasure… are the most important things in life” or “other religions” or “if you are good enough, you can get to heaven.”)
  3. What happens when people build their lives on these truths?
  4. What truth do you want to build your life on?

 

Rhyme Time

A life built on the Rock

Will withstand every shock!

 

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God’s Recipe (OBJ LESSON)


Cake - ChocolateTime

10 minutes
Description

This object lesson shows how God uses both good and bad things in our life to make us into the person we are.  It uses the analogy of baking a cake with all its ingredients.

Scriptures

  • Romans 8:28

 

Materials

  • Flour (about half a cup)
  • Baking soda (about half a cup)
  • Salt (about half a cup)
  • Vinegar (about half a cup)
  • Baking powder (about half a cup)
  • Unsweetened cocoa powder (about half a cup)
  • Sugar (about half a cup)
  • Eggs (2)
  • Milk (about half a cup)
  • Vegetable oil (about half a cup)
  • Plastic spoons (10)
  • Snack cakes (10 – chocolate flavor – something from Little Debbie’s or something similar)
  • Table (1)
  • Chef costume (optional – apron, chef’s hat wooden spoon, etc.)
  • Slip of paper with Romans 8:28 written on it.
  • Bible

 

Preparation

  • Line your ingredients up in small containers on a table in the front of the room.
  • Place a spoon in front of each ingredient.
  • Write the Scripture on the slip of paper, and put the slip of paper in your chef’s hat or somewhere else you can easily get to it during the lesson.
  • Hide the snack cakes somewhere that no one will be able to see them.
  • Practice the script.

Procedure

Use the following script (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “How many of you like cake?”  (Acknowledge responses.)
  • “Me, too!  I love it!”
  • “Hey, if you like cake, maybe you can help me with something!”
  • “Can I get ten volunteers to come up front?” (Select 10 volunteers.  Have each one take up a position behind one of the ingredients.  If you don’t have enough participants, have some of them taste more than one ingredient in the upcoming demonstration.)
  • “So, I like cake a lot, and you like cake a lot, right?”
  • “Then, let’s make some cake!”
  • “I have this recipe.”  (Hold up a sheet of paper to represent your recipe.)
  • “It says we need flour, baking soda, salt, vinegar, baking powder, cocoa, sugar, eggs, milk, and vegetable oil.”  (Point out the different ingredients as you mention them.)
  • “That’s why I need you guys.  Each one of you is responsible for one of these ingredients.”
  • “So, let’s see…the recipe says, ‘Preheat oven to 350 degrees.’”
  • “Oops, I forgot to do that part.”
  • “’Grease and flour two, nine-inch cake pans.’”
  • “Uh-oh…I didn’t do that, either.”
    “’Mix all the ingredients for three minutes.  Then pour into cake pans and bake in over for 35 minutes…’”
  • “35 minutes!  That’s WAY too long!  We don’t have that kind of time.”
  • “I’ve got a better idea!”
  • “Let’s just eat the ingredients one at a time.”
  • “They are all going to the same place anyway, right?”
  • “When they get to our bellies, they will mix together to make a cake!”
  • “So, here’s where I need your help!”
  • “I need each of you to take one spoonful of your ingredient and tell us how it tastes.” (Most won’t want to try their ingredient, but urge them a few times.  If they still don’t want to do it, say, “Oh, all right!  I’ll try it.” Then, make a big show of how bad it tastes.  Gag, sputter, buckle your knees, gasp, whatever…  Even if they try their ingredient first, you should also try it.  The only exception would be the eggs, because eating raw eggs might make you sick.)
  • “That was absolutely terrible!”
  • “Only the sugar and milk tasted good.”
  • “I love cake, and it always tastes soooooo good!  Why do the ingredients taste soooooo bad?” (Acknowledge responses.)
  • “Oh!  You mean they only taste good when you mix them all together?”
  • “That reminds me of a Bible verse!”  (Take off your hat, and pull out the slip of paper with the Scripture on it.  Ask one of your volunteers to read it aloud.)
  • “This Scripture means that God uses ALL THINGS for our good – good things and bad things – good ingredients like the sugar and milk and bad ingredients like the baking soda and vinegar.”
  • “God mixes them all together in our lives to help make us into the people He wants us to become.”
  • “This won’t happen right away…it will take time.”
  • “Many times in life, we have to go through tings that are really bitter and unpleasant.”
  • “At the time, they seem terrible, but God has a recipe, and He will take that bad thing and make something good out of it if we will just be patient and wait for Him to work.”
  • “But if we will trust God with even the bitter stuff in our lives, He will bring the sweetness out – just like in these cakes that I forgot I bought this weekend!!!”  (Give each volunteer one of the snack cakes.)
  • “How do those taste?”  (Acknowledge responses.  Then thank and dismiss your volunteers.  Use the Debriefing Questions and the Rhyme Time below to reinforce the learning.)

 

Debriefing Questions

 

  1. Why do you think God allows us to go through the bitter and difficult things in our lives?
  2. Have you ever been through something terrible but then seen later how God used it to help you?  (Allow one or two to share their examples.)
  3. Based on what you’ve learned, how will you handle those bitter and difficult times in the future?

 

Rhyme Time

Sometimes we’ve got to wait

For God to make it great!

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Filed under Failure, faith, God's Plan, Object Lesson, struggles, Suffering

God’s Covering (OBJ LESSON)


God's CoveringTime

20 minutes
Description

This object lesson shows how God can protect us during times of suffering and temptation.  It uses some science and some surprising ways to keep balloons from popping even when pierced or put over a flame.

 

Scriptures

  • Psalm 32:7

 

Materials

  • Balloons (3 per child and 5 for facilitator (includes a few extras just in case))
  • Wooden skewers (2 per child and 2 for facilitator)
  • Vegetable oil (just a little to dip the skewers in)
  • Duct tape (1 roll)
  • Candle with a stand (1 set)
  • Matches or a lighter
  • Medicine dropper (1 – for putting water into a balloon before you blow it up)
  • Water (1 cup per group)
  • Bible

 

Preparation

  • Get your materials ready.
  • Practice the script.

 

Procedure

Use the following script (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “Did you know that bad stuff happens to everyone – even Christians?”  (Listen for responses.)
  • “If you don’t follow Jesus, you’ll be like this balloon when bad stuff happens.”  (Blow up and tie a balloon.)
  • “This wooden skewer represents bad stuff that happens to them.”  (Use the skewer to pop the balloon.)
  • “That’s not good!  I don’t want to be like that balloon, do you?”  (Listen for responses.)
  • “But Christians don’t have to worry, because God protects them when bad stuff happens.” (Have a volunteer read Psalm 32:7.  Then, blow up and tie another balloon, this time about halfway to two-thirds full.)
  • “Even Christians are still like this balloon, but they have something special.”  (Put a piece of duct tape over the balloon on two different sides.)
  • “They have God’s covering to protect them when bad stuff happens.”  (Slowly twist the skewer through the tape, through the balloon and through the other side.  Then show it to the kids.)
  • “Pretty cool, huh?  The bad thing still happened to the balloon, but this time, it didn’t pop, because it had God’s covering.”
  • “God know where our weak areas are, and He will protect us in those places.”
  • “God protects us in another way, too.”  (Blow up and tie another balloon about halfway to two-thirds full. Take one of the skewers, and dip it into the vegetable oil. Carefully twist the skewer into the nipple of the balloon (the thickest part at the very top) and then though the other side close to where you tied the knot.)
  • “Oil in the Bible often represents the anointing of the Lord.  God anoints us when He has something special and difficult for us to do, and the anointing protects us from Satan’s attacks.”
  • “I know one more way God protects us!”  (Light the candle. Use the medicine dropper to put one dropper-full of water into a balloon. Blow up the balloon and tie it with the water inside. Hold the balloon over the flame of the candle.  You can even allow the flame to touch the balloon where the water settles.)
  • “If we will fill ourselves with Living Water by reading God’s Word every day, He will protect us from popping when Satan turns up the heat in our lives.” (Pass out balloons and other materials to the kids, and let them try the three experiments.  Help them if they need it to tie balloons, pierce balloons with skewers and hold balloons over the flame. When they’ve all had a chance to try, discuss the Debrief Questions below.  You can use the Rhyme Time to reinforce the main point of the lesson.)

 

Debriefing Questions

  1. Why didn’t the balloons pop when the skewers went through them?
  2. How about when you put the balloon over the flame?
  3. How is this like how God protects us during times of suffering?
  4. If you have to go through a time of suffering in the future, how will you handle it?

 

Rhyme Time

We have God’s covering

To protect us when we’re suffering.

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Filed under Annointing, Object Lesson, struggles, temptation

Learning Links (OBJ LESSON)


LinksTime

15 minutes
Description

This object lesson teaches that we learn by linking new ideas to old ones and demonstrates that this is the method Jesus used to teach about the Kingdom of God.

Scriptures

  • Mark 4:26-32 (man who throw seeds; mustard seed)
  • Luke 13:20-21 (yeast)

Materials

  • Large paperclips, carabineers or toy chain links (50 or more)
  • Slips of paper to mark places in the Bible for the verses you will share.
  • Bible

 

Preparation

  • Form a chain of your paperclips, carabineers or toy chain links.  It should include 30-40 links, so that you can create a large “ball” of links when you hold them all in your hands.
  • Have your other links separated individually and at the front of the teaching area.
  • Write the Scriptures you want read on individual slips of paper, and put them in the Bible at the appropriate places.
  • Practice the script.

Procedure

Use the following script and instructions (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “When Jesus taught, He used a teaching technique called a parable.”
  • “A parable is a simple story that teaches a spiritual lesson.”
  • “The word, ‘parable’ means, ‘to throw alongside of.’” (from the Greek – para, means ‘beside,’ and bole, means ‘a throw’)
  • “With His parables, Jesus was placing two ideas right beside each other.”
  • “He would always use one idea that the listener already knew, and it was usually about farming or fishing or everyday living.”
  • “Then, He would compare what the listener already knew to something they didn’t know about, like the Kingdom of God.”
  • “Let’s look at a few examples.”  (Ask volunteers to read the following Scriptures: Mark 4:26-32, Luke 13:20-21.)
  • “In these Scriptures, Jesus uses examples about farming and cooking to make comparisons to the Kingdom of God.”
  • “In other Scriptures, He uses children, camels, childbirth, light, salt, parties (feasts or banquets), weddings, masters and servants, and fig trees to teach about the Kingdom.”
  • “Let me show you why Jesus taught in this way.”  (Ask a volunteer to come forward, and hand him/her a single link.)
  • “The people Jesus was teaching about the Kingdom of God didn’t know anything about it, but they did know some things about fishing and farming and weddings and trees…”
  • “This link (ask volunteer to hold up their link) represents the knowledge that the people already had about ordinary things in their lives.” (Hold up your “ball” of links.)
  • “This giant ball of links represents everything that Jesus knew about the Kingdom of God.”
  • “If Jesus had tried to give them the entire ball of knowledge all at one time, they wouldn’t have been able to handle it.”  (Toss the ball of links to the volunteer.  It’s okay if he/she doesn’t catch it.  That will illustrate your point.)
  • “Jesus knew that he had to start small and start with what they already knew.”  (Take your ball of links back, and remove one link.)
  • “So, He taught in parables and said this thing that you already know (point to the link in the volunteer’s hand) is like the Kingdom of God.” (Hold up the ball of links) in this way (hold up the single link that you removed from the ball. Then, connect it to the link in the volunteer’s hand.)
  • “The Kingdom of God is like a man who throws seeds.” (Remove another link from the ball and connect it to the volunteer’s links.)
  • “The Kingdom of God is like a mustard seed.” (Remove another link from the ball and connect it to the volunteer’s links.)
  • “The Kingdom of God is like yeast that works its way through the dough.” (Remove another link from the ball and connect it to the volunteer’s links.)
  • “Unless you become like little children, you cannot enter the Kingdom of God.” (Remove another link from the ball and connect it to the volunteer’s links.)
  • “In the Kingdom of God, there will be a great wedding feast!” (Remove another link from the ball and connect it to the volunteer’s links.)
  • “Just like you see new leaves on the fig tree when summer is coming, you will see certain signs that tell you when the Kingdom of God is near.” (Remove another link from the ball and connect it to the volunteer’s links.)
  • “You cannot enter the Kingdom of God unless you are born a second time in your spirit.” (Remove another link from the ball and connect it to the volunteer’s links.)
  • “By teaching in this way, Jesus helps understand something very big and difficult to understand.” (Hold up ball of links.)
  • “And this is the way all learning works.”
  • “We connect something we know to something we don’t know, and it helps us to understand it better.”  (Thank and dismiss your volunteer.)

 

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Joseph’s Journey (BOOK)


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This is my latest book, and it’s about the life of Joseph.  It includes 21 object lessons, challenges and Bible lessons for teaching children about forgiveness, hardship, and God’s plan for our lives.

To view the book on Amazon, click the link to the left.

Here’s a description:

Joseph’s life is one of the most exciting stories of transformation in the Bible. From favorite son to slave to prisoner to leader of Egypt, Joseph finds himself in dramatically different situations and roles. But no matter what his circumstances, Joseph continued to trust in God, and God was faithful to use Joseph in powerful ways.

This book includes the object lessons, challenges and Bible lessons that I’ve used over the years to teach about the life of Joseph and the important principles that can be learned from his example.

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Filed under Book, Joseph, Object Lesson