Category Archives: Game

Capture the Spear (GAME)


David Steals King Saul's SpearTime

20 minutes
Description

This is a game that simulates the time when David snuck down into King Saul’s camp and stole his spear and water jug while his army was sleeping.

 

Audience

Children, Youth

 

Materials

o  Stick (1 – long and straight is better, because it represents Saul’s spear)

o  Water bottle (1)

o  Masking tape or chalk to mark a line on the floor or ground

o  Bible

 

Scriptures

o  1 Samuel 26:1-25

 

Preparation

o  Mark a line on the floor or ground to separate the two “armies.”

o  Read the Scriptures, and be prepared to summarize the story.

o  Mark or highlight the Scriptures in the Bible if you want to read them during the lesson.

o  Practice the script.

Procedure

Use the following script and instructions (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “One time when David was running from King Saul, a group called the Ziphites told King Saul where David was hiding.”
  • “King Saul took his 3,000 best troops and went to capture or kill David.”
  • “David was hiding in the wilderness, and he was able to sneak up on King Saul’s camp while they were sleeping one night.”
  • “The Bible says that God put a deep sleep on all of King Saul’s army, so they didn’t wake up when David and one of his men crept up to the place where King Saul was sleeping.”
  • “David’s soldier offered to kill King Saul right then and there so that David could be king, but David wouldn’t allow him to hurt the king.”
  • “David didn’t want to be king until God was ready for him to be king.”
  • “So, he instructed his soldier to take King Saul’s spear and water jug.”
  • “They escaped to a safe place, and then David called out to Abner, the commander of King Saul’s army.”
    • “He said, ‘Abner!  Abner!  Why are you sleeping when your king’s enemy has come to destroy him?  You didn’t guard your master, and I was able to get his spear and his water jug.’”
  • “King Saul awoke.  He was shocked and felt guilty for how he was treating David compared to the kindness David had shown him in preserving his life.”
  • “He invited David to come back with him and promised never to try to hurt him again.”
  • “David, though, knew better.  He knew he couldn’t trust King Saul, so he returned the king’s spear and water jug and went back to his hideout.”
  • “So, let’s play a game about this story.”
  • “It’s called ‘Capture the Spear,’ and it’s played with two teams.”  (Divide the group into two (roughly) evenly sized teams, and give one team the “spear” and water jug.  You can also divide the groups up between kids and adults if that works better in your context.)
  • “This group with the spear and water jug will be King Saul’s army, and the other group will be David’s army.”
  • “This line (point out the line you’ve marked on the floor or ground) separates the camps between the two armies.”
  • “King Saul’s army picks one person to be King Saul and puts the spear and water jug one, big step away.”
  • “Everyone else in King Saul’s army has to be at least one, big step away from the spear and water jug.”
  • “They also have to close their eyes, because God has put them into a deep sleep.”
  • “David’s army is going to try to sneak into King Saul’s camp and steal their spear and water jug.”
  • “Here’s the hard part – King Saul can tell his (or her) army to open their eyes two times during the game.”
  • “If David’s soldiers are past the line when King Saul’s army opens their eyes, King Saul’s men can try to capture one of them by encircling them (holding their teammates’ hands so that the person is trapped).”
  • “If even one of David’s soldiers gets caught, King Saul’s army wins!”
  • “David’s soldiers can escape by crossing the line again.”
  • “If all David’s soldiers get back across the line, they are safe, and King Saul’s army has to close their eyes again.”
  • “If David’s soldiers take both the spear and the water jug across the line, they win!”
  • “They have to carry them over the line; they can’t throw them.”
  • “And if King Saul’s army opens their eyes two times but can’t catch any of David’s soldiers, David’s army wins!”
  • “Any questions?”
  • Play several rounds, and let them switch between playing King Saul’s and David’s armies if they want.  When they finish, debrief with the following questions:
    • Why do you think God put King Saul’s soldiers into a deep sleep?
    • Why didn’t David let his soldier kill King Saul?
    • Do you think this was the right decision?  Why or why not?
  • Review the Rhyme Time below to reinforce the main message of the lesson.

 

Rhyme Time

David took some of King Saul’s things,

But he waited on God to make him king.

 

 

Source: Michael Kientz

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Filed under Calling, Challenges, David, faith, Game, God's Protection, King Saul, Obedience

Round the Mountain (GAME)


David Cuts Sauls RobeTime

20 minutes
Description

This is a game that simulates the time when Saul chased David around the mountain and almost caught him.  It also references when David crept up on Saul in the cave and cut off a piece of Saul’s robe.

 

Audience

Children, Youth

 

Materials

o  Bandanas, handkerchiefs or large scraps of cloth (2 – in different colors)

o  Bible

 

Scriptures

o  1 Samuel 23:24-28

o  1 Samuel 24:1-22

 

Preparation

o  Read the Scriptures, and be prepared to summarize the stories.

o  Mark or highlight the Scriptures in the Bible if you want to read them during the lesson.

o  Practice the script.

Procedure

Use the following script and instructions (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “King Saul didn’t like David at all!”
  • “He was afraid that the people in his kingdom liked David so much that it would make it easy for David to become king instead of him.”
  • “So King Saul chased David throughout the wilderness of Israel.”
  • “One time, King Saul got information about where David was hiding, and he took his army to try and kill him.”  (Summarize or have a volunteer read 1 Samuel 23:24-28.)
  • “Thank goodness the Philistines attacked!  Otherwise, King Saul might have caught David on the mountain!”
  • “There is another story in the next chapter that tells about a time when King Saul was close to catching David but didn’t know it.”  (Summarize 1 Samuel 24:1-22.)
  • “This is a pretty funny story, because David was in the same cave where King Saul went to use the restroom!”
  • “David was able to sneak up on King Saul when he was doing his business and cut off a piece of his robe.”
  • “A king’s robe represented his right to be king.”
  • “When David called to King Saul from the cave and showed him the piece of robe, it was like David was saying, ‘I could be the king now if I wanted to, but I don’t want to be king until God makes me king.’”
  • “So, let’s play a game about these two stories.”
  • “It’s called ‘Round the Mountain,’ and it’s played with two teams.”  (Divide the group into two (roughly) evenly sized teams, and give each one a bandana, handkerchief or strip of cloth.  You can also divide the groups up between kids and adults if that works better in your context.)
  • “This group will be King Saul’s army, and this group will be David’s army.”  (Make these designations randomly.  However, if you have adults playing, they should be King Saul’s group, since they are the “bad guys.”)
  • “Each group should line up, single-file (one behind another).”
  • “The last person in line should tuck the cloth in the back of your waistband, like a tail.”
  • “This cloth represents your ‘robe,’ and most of it has to be showing so that the other team has a chance to grab it.” (Make sure that the ‘robe” is showing clearly with just a corner tucked in.)
  • “The person at the front of the line is either King Saul or David, depending on the team.”
  • “The goal of the game is to capture the other army’s ‘robe’ as you pretend to run around the mountain.”
  •  “Only King Saul or David can grab the robe from the other team’s army.”
  • “Everyone else in the line has to put their hands on the shoulders of the person in front of them.”
  • “If your hands come off that person’s shoulders, you have to stop until you get your hands back on their shoulders.”
  • “When I say ‘GO!’ King Saul and David will try to grab the other army’s ‘robe’ while the armies of each team try to keep it away from them.”
  • “If your ‘robe’ falls out, but no one has grabbed it, you can try to put it back in.”
  • “The first team to capture the ‘robe’ wins!”
  • “Any questions?”
  • Play several rounds, and let them switch between playing King Saul’s and David’s armies if they want.  When they finish, debrief with the following questions:
    • Do you think God sent the Philistine army so that David and his men could get away from King Saul?  Why or why not?
    • Why didn’t David kill Saul when he had a chance in the cave?
    • Do you think David made the right choice?  Why or why not?
  • Review the Rhyme Time below to reinforce the main message of the lesson.

 

Rhyme Time

King Saul chased, and David ran

Because he trusted in God’s plan.

 

 

Source: Michael Kientz

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Filed under Adversity, David, faith, Game, King Saul, Obedience, Trial

Works Test (GAME)


Works TestTime

20 minutes
Description

This game helps participants to understand that not all good works have the same value in God’s eyes.  Good things done with bad or selfish motives are not worth nearly as much as those done for the right reasons.  The game teaches about Paul’s writing about the believers’ judgment (aka “the Bema Judgment”), where our works will be tested.

Scriptures

  • 1 Corinthians 3:11-15

 

Materials

  • Printouts of the file “Works Test – Cards” (You can find this file on the Lesson and Material Downloads page at www.teachingthem.com.)
  • Scissors
  • Glue or clear tape
  • Prize(s) for winner(s) – Optional
  • Bible

Preparation

  • Cut out the Works Test cards.  There are three per page, and they each have two sides – a “Motive” side and a “Good Work” side.
  • Fold the cards over so that the “Good Work” shows on one side and the “Motive” shows on the other.
  • Glue or tape the two sides together.
  • When they are dry (if you used glue), turn all the cards so that the “Good Work” side is facing up.
    • Practice the script.

Procedure

Use the following script (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “A teacher named Paul told us about the judgment for believers that will happen when Jesus comes back.”
  • “This judgment is just for rewards; there won’t be any punishments.”  (Have a volunteer read 1 Corinthians 3:11-15.)
  • “The foundation he talks about is Jesus and the Truth that He is our Lord and Savior.”
  • “This foundation is very important.  If you don’t have Jesus as your Lord and Savior, then it won’t matter how many good things you do.  There won’t be any rewards for you when Jesus comes back – only punishments.”
  • “But, if you have Jesus as your foundation, then the good things you do start to earn you treasures in heaven.”
  • “So, Paul is saying in this Scripture that when we do good works, we are building on the foundation of Jesus and the Truth that He is Lord and Savior.”
  • “When we stand before Jesus at the judgment for believers, He will test our works with fire.  Good works done for good reasons (‘gold, silver and costly stones’) will survive the fire and we will be rewarded for them.  But bad works or good works done for the wrong reasons will burn up like wood, hay or straw do when they catch on fire.”
  • “Let’s play a game that teaches us about this.”
  • “To play this game, you need to know that ‘good works’ are things that we do that have good results and that ‘motives’ are the reasons we do the things we do.”  \

Game Play

  • Shuffle the cards thoroughly, and make sure that all the “Good Work” sides are facing up. 
  • Deal the cards so that each person gets 10. 
  • Instruct participants not to turn the cards over but to arrange them in two rows of five in front of them.
  • Beginning with the youngest person in the group, have each person read ONE of their cards “Good Works” out loud and then turn the card over.
  • Have the person read the “Motive” on the other side out loud.
  • If the “Motive” has a picture of a pot of gold, bars of silver or a costly stone, the person gets to keep it.
  • If the “Motive” has a picture of firewood, a bale of hay or a straw broom, the person has to “burn it” by putting it into the center of the group.
  • Go around the group three to five times depending on how much time you have.
  • Then, award points – 3 points for any “Gold” motives, 2 points for any “Silver” motives and 1 point for any “Costly Stone” motives.
  • The person with the most points wins the game.
  • You can then turn over all the other cards if you want to.
  • Award a prize to the winner if you want to.
  • After the game is finished, discuss the Debrief questions below.
  • You can use the Rhyme Time to reinforce the main point of the lesson.

 

Debriefing Questions

 

  1. Why do you think your motive is important to God?
  2. What do you think you need to do to earn gold, silver or costly stones in heaven?
  3. What will you do differently now that you know about how to earn treasures in heaven?

 

Rhyme Time

When my motive is good,

I don’t make straw, hay or wood!

 

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Filed under Game, Judgment, Motivation

Satan’s Tactics (GAME)


Roaring LionTime

15 minutes
Description

Satan has many different ways to attack us.  This game will help children to understand that they can attack back with prayer.  The game is a tossing game in which children will try to knock out targets with beanbags or something else that they can throw.

 

Scriptures

  • 1 Peter 5:8

 

Materials

  • Board with cutouts for targets (I recommend a sheet of plywood with sixteen (16) rectangles cut out of it (made to look like a collage picture frame).  There should be four cutouts per row and four rows.  Each cutout should be approximately six inches tall by 4 inches wide.  Sheets of paper will be taped to the back of the board over the holes. The board should have a stand so that it is free-standing (or leaning) and can withstand being hit with beanbags.  You can find a diagram in the file “Satan’s Tactics – Board Diagram” on the Lesson and Material Downloads page at http://www.teaching.them.com.  Alternatively, you could tape the Tactic Cards mentioned below to the floor and have participants try to throw a beanbag on top of them.)
  • Tactic cards to place in each of the cutouts  (You can find these in the file “Satan’s Tactics – Tactic Cards” on the Lesson and Material Downloads page at http://www.teaching.them.com.)
  • Tape to tape the cards in each of the cutouts and to mark the throwing line
  • Beanbags (3-6 – you can substitute tennis balls or some other throwing object – label them with the word, “PRAYER.”)
  • Scissors for cutting out the tactic cards
  • Permanent marker for labeling the bean bags
  • Bible

 

Preparation

  • Create your target board.
  • Print out the tactic cards and cut the pages down the middle. (There are two tactic cards per page.)
  • Tape the tactic cards in the holes on the back of the target board with the words showing out.
  • Use the tape to mark a throwing line about ten feet away from the target board.
  • Label the beanbags to say “PRAYER.”
  • Practice the script.

 

Procedure

Use the following script (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “We have an enemy, and he is trying to attack us.”  (Have a volunteer read the 1 Peter 5:8.)
  • “Satan has many different tactics (or ways) that he uses to attack us, but we can attack back with prayer to God.”
  • “We’ve put many of Satan’s tactics on the target board over there, and your goal is to knock them all out with these bean bags, which represent prayers.”
  • “Everyone gets two chances to throw a ‘prayer’ at the targets and try to defeat one of Satan’s tactics.”
  • “Then, we’ll rotate.  We’ll keep going until all of Satan’s tactics have been defeated.”
    • “Any questions?”  (Answer questions if there are any.  Then, play the game, allowing the youngest person in the group to go first.  When all the Tactics have been knocked out, discuss the Debrief Questions below. You can use the Rhyme Time to reinforce the main point of the lesson.)

 

Debriefing Questions

 

  1. Have you ever been attacked in one of these ways?  Which ones?
  2. Do you think prayer would help?  Why or why not?
  3. Do you know of any other attacks Satan makes against us?
  4. How can you fight against those?

 

Rhyme Time

When Satan attacks

Send a prayer back!

 

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Filed under Fear, Game, prayer, Satan's tactics, Spiritual Warfare, temptation, Worry

Moses, Aaron and Hur vs. the Amalekites (GAME)


Moses, Aaron and Hur in BattleTime

15-20 minutes

 

Description

This game illustrates the story of Israel fighting against the Amalekites.  When Moses raised his hands, Israel pushed back the Amalekites, but when his hands were lowered, the Amalekites pushed back the Israelites.  Aaron and Hur held up Moses’ arms to ensure the Israelite victory.

 

Scripture

  • Exodus 17:8-16

 

Materials

  • Masking tape – one roll
  • Dowel rod, stick or broom handle to serve as Moses’ staff
  • Chair or something to represent stone for Moses to sit on

 

Preparation

  • Use masking tape to mark one line in the center of the room and two lines on either side of the room.

 

Procedure

Use this script or modify to suit your needs.

  • “We’re going to play a game to help us remember and understand a story from the Bible.”
  • “The story is about Moses and the Israelites in a war against the Amalekites.”  (Have a volunteer read Exodus 17:8-16.)
  • “When Moses’ hands were up, the Israelites were winning, but when he got tired and lowered his arms, the Amalekites started winning.”
  • “So Aaron and Hur sat him on a stone and held up his hands until the victory was assured for Israel.”
  • “So, to play this game, I need three volunteers to be Moses, Aaron and Hur.”  (Select volunteers.  Have “Moses” sit on the chair or other item representing the rock.  Have “Aaron” and “Hur” stand by his sides.)
  • “Now, I need to divide the rest of you into pairs.”  (Line everyone up in a single-file line from smallest to largest.  Count the number of participants.  Divide this number by two and have all participants count off to that number.  For example, if you have 16 participants, half of that is 8.  Number off the participants 1-8.  Then have the two “ones” get together and the two “twos” get together and so on.  Position each pair over the line made with tape in the center of the room.)
  • “This side (choose a side) represents the Israelites.”
  • “This side (choose a side) represents the Amalekites.”
  • “When Aaron and Hur raise Moses’ arms (Have your volunteers demonstrate.), you can push against your opponent only if you are an Israelite.”
  • “When Aaron and Hur put Moses’ arms down (Have your volunteers demonstrate.), you can push against your opponent only if you are an Amalekite.”
  • “If it’s not your turn to push, you can try to hold your ground, but you cannot push back.”
  • “The goal is to force your opponent across the line behind him or her on their side of the room.  If you do, you win!”
  • “The first three to win their battle will get to replace Moses, Aaron and Hur in the next round.”
  • “Any questions?” (Begin the first round.  Make sure that Moses’ arms go up and down fairly quickly to give both sides a chance.  After you’ve done a few rounds, debrief using the following questions.)

 

Debrief Question

  • Why do you think God allowed the battle to be decided by whether or not Moses’ arms were up?
  • Do you think God would have allowed Israel to lose the entire battle if Moses, Aaron and Hur had been too tired to keep Moses’ arms up?  Why or why not?
  • How do you think the Israelites felt about Moses, Aaron and Hur after the battle?
  • Why do you think Moses built an altar and called it, “The Lord is My Banner?”
  • What can we learn from this story that we can apply to our own lives?

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Filed under Game, Moses

Gates of Jerusalem (GAME)


Gates of JerusalemTime

20 minutes
Description

This game teaches about the gates of Jerusalem during Nehemiah’s time and uses them as a metaphor for how we should conduct our Christian Walk.  Participants will play a dice and memory game to familiarize themselves with the gates and the lessons that they teach.

Materials

  • Printouts of the file, “Gates of Jerusalem – Cards.”  (You can download this file from the website www.teachingthem.com on the Lesson and Material Downloads page.)
  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • Dice (2)
  • Small candies to use for rewards for right answers (enough for everyone to have 2-3 pieces each)
  • Lamination sheets and a laminator (optional – best if you plan to play the game multiple times)
  • Bible

Scriptures

  • Nehemiah 3
  • Psalm 23:4, 119:97-98
  • Matthew 4:19, 24:27
  • John 1:29, 7:38
  • 2 Corinthians 10:3-5
  • Ephesians 6:10-17
  • Hebrews 12:1-2
  • 1 John 1:9
  • Revelation 19:11, 22:12

 

Preparation

  • Print the file “Gates of Jerusalem – Cards.” (in color, preferably)
  • Cut out the pictures and their descriptions.  (Be careful not to separate the pictues form the descriptions underneath them.)
  • Fold the pictures over so that the descriptions are on the opposite side.
  • Glue the two sides together.
  • Laminate all the cards. (optional)
  • Arrange the cards according to the order pictured on the second slide in the file with the cards.
  • Mark the Scriptures in your Bible with a bookmark so that they will be easy to find.
  • Practice the script.

Procedure

Use the following script (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “We’re going to play a game to teach us about the gates of Jerusalem during the time of Nehemiah.”
  • “We can read about these gates in chapter 3 of the book of Nehemiah.”
  • “In this chapter, Nehemiah organizes everyone to rebuild the walls of Jerusalem so that they can protect themselves and their Temple from their enemies.”
  • “The gates he mentions in the story were real gates at the time, but we can also use them as a reminder about how we should live as Christians.” (Point out the cards you’ve laid out in the shape of the walls of Jerusalem.)
  • “These cards represent the walls and gates of Jerusalem.”
  • “The ones that look like rocks are the parts of the wall.  They don’t move.”
  • “The ones with pictures on them represent the gates, and you can open the gates by turning over the card.”  (As you go through the next part of the script, turn over the cards and read the descriptions on the opposite side.  Then, return the cards to their original position with the picture showing up.)
  • “The first gate is the Sheep Gate.  It was used to bring sheep into the city for sacrifices, and it was very close to the Temple for this reason.  It reminds us that Jesus went to the cross like a sacrificial lamb.  We should remember that He died to pay for our sins. When we accept this gift, we become Christians.”  (Have a volunteer read John 1:29.)
  • “This first gate represents the gate we walk through when we give our hearts to Jesus.”
  • “The second gate is the Fish Gate.  This gate was used by fishermen to bring their fish into Jerusalem to sell.  It reminds us that as followers of Jesus, He is calling us to become “fishers of men.”  That means that we should try to help others know about Jesus.”  (Have a volunteer read Matthew 4:19.)
  • “The third gate is the Old Gate.  We aren’t sure why it was called the Old Gate, but it may have been because it was part of an older city and brought to Jerusalem.  It reminds us that God’s Truth is older than time.  When Satan tries to trick us with lies, we should use God’s Truth to fight against him.”  (Have a volunteer read Ephesians 6:10-17.)
  • “The fourth gate is the Valley Gate.  It opened into a valley on the west side of the city of Jerusalem.  Mountaintops are exciting, but valleys are hard.  They represent the difficult things we go through that help us depend on God and make us stronger.  There is nothing growing above the treeline on a mountain, but valleys are typically lush with growth.”  (Have a volunteer read Psalm 23:4.)
  • “The fifth gate is the Dung Gate.  This is the gate that led to the Valley of Hinnom, where the people burned their garbage.  This gate represents how God uses the valleys in our lives to show us some of our garbage and sinfulness.  When God shows us what is sinful and bad in us, we should get rid of it like smelly garbage (or poop!) so that we can follow Jesus.”  (Have a volunteer read Hebrews 12:1-2.)
  • “The sixth gate is the Fountain Gate.  It was at the end of the Pool of Siloam, and provided refreshing waters for the people of the city.  It represents the streams of Living Water that should flow from us to bless others.  Once we have gotten rid of the ‘dung’ in our lives, God’s Living Waters (which represent God’s Word and His Spirit) can flow through us.”  (Have a volunteer read John 7:38.)
  • “The seventh gate is the Water Gate.  This gate was at the beginning of a famous tunnel that King Hezekiah dug to bring water into the city in case enemy armies lay siege to Jerusalem.  Because the water came through a tunnel, it couldn’t be poisoned by their enemies.  The Water Gates reminds us that we should wash every day in the Word of God by reading our Bibles.  God’s Word is always pure, and Satan can’t poison it.”  (Have a volunteer read Psalm 119:97-98.)
  • “The eighth gate is the Horse Gate.  It was the gate where the horses were taken for water.  Horses in the Bible represent war, so this gate reminds us that we should always be ready to do battle with spiritual forces of evil.  (Have a volunteer read 2 Corinthians 10:3-5.) It is also pointing forward to the time when Jesus will come again.  The Bible says He will come again riding on a white horse.  (Have a volunteer read Revelation 19:11.)
  • “The ninth gate is the East Gate.  It was on the east side of the city and faced the Mountain of Olives.  This gate is very important for Jews and Christians, because the Bible tells us that Jesus will come the second time from the East.  This gate reminds us to have hope because Jesus is coming again.” (Have a volunteer read Matthew 24:27.)
  • “The tenth and final gate is the Inspection Gate (or Muster Gate). It opened to a road that led to Miphkad (“appointed place”).  This is where the people were numbered for the Temple tax.  It reminds us that we should take time at the end of each day to allow God to review the day with us.  If He brings to mind sins we have done, we should confess them and ask for forgiveness.  (Have a volunteer read 1 John 1:9.)  It also points forward to the time when Jesus comes again.  There will be a time of judgment for believers called the Bema Judgment.  At this time, He will evaluate all that we have done and reward us for our good works. (There is no punishment at this judgment.).”  (Have a volunteer read Revelation 22:12.)
  • “In the story in Nehemiah, he mentions the Sheep Gate again at the end of chapter 3.  This is to remind us that everything begins and ends with Jesus and that He is coming again.”
  • “So, here’s how to play the game.”
  • “The youngest person goes first.”
  • “He or she rolls two dice and then has to tell us the name of the gate for the number he/she rolls and what the gate means.” (Point out the numbers in the upper, right-hand corner of each gate picture.  The Sheep gate is numbered both 1 and 11, because it is mentioned twice in the story.)
  • “For example, if you roll a 2 and a 3, that equals 5.  You would have to tell us the name and meaning of the Dung Gate.”
  • “If you roll a 12, the person on your left gets to pick which gate you have to tell us about.”
  • “If you get it right (or mostly right), you get a piece of candy!”
  • “After your turn, the person on your right gets to roll.”
  • “Ready to play?  (Play several rounds.  Then, you can use the Rhyme Time below to reinforce the message and the Debrief Questions to apply the lesson to their personal lives.)

 

Rhyme Time

When gate meanings are unlocked

We understand our Christian walk.

 

Debrief Questions

  • Which gates are hard for you to understand? (Explain to help make their meaning clearer.)
  • What gates have you already gone through in your life?
  • What was that like?
  • Which gate do you think is the coolest?  Why?
  • Who could you teach about the gates?

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Filed under Game, Nehemiah

Action Plan BINGO (ACTION PLAN)


Action Plan BINGO CardTime

Varies – to be used throughout a workshop or other learning event and then debriefed at the end.  The debrief should last approximately 30 minutes.

 

Purpose

This activity helps participants to create an action plan of things they want to do as a result of their learning.  It does it in a fun way by making it into a BINGO game and gets peer feedback on how realistic and actionable the plans are.

 

Materials

  • Copies of the file, “Action Plan BINGO – Cards.” (You can find this file on the Lesson and Material Downloads page at www.teachingthem.com.  You will need one copy per participant.)
  • Small prizes for BINGOs.  It is possible and even desirable for participants to get more than one BINGO, so you should probably have an average of three prizes per participant just in case.  Candies or other small items work well for this.

 

Preparation

  • Print copies of the file “Action Plan BINGO – Cards” for each participant.

 

Procedure

(follow this script, or modify to suit your needs)

  • (At the beginning of the learning event or workshop) “We’re going to play a game during this workshop that will help you to develop a strong plan for using what you learn after you leave.)
  • “It’s called, ‘Action Plan BINGO.”  (Hand out BINGO cards to each participant.)
  • “There are 25 spaces on this BINGO card.”
  • “The goal of this game is to write one action in each box.”
  • “These are actions you plan to take when you return to work.”
  • “The one in the middle is a ‘Grace Space,’ which means that you get it for free and don’t have to put any action items in it for it to count.”
  • “Anytime you think of an action you want to take as a result of what you are learning, write it in one of the boxes.”
  • “Make sure it is clear, realistic and some that will help you be more effective.” (You may want to have them write in SMART goals in each box.  These would be Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Time-Bound.)
  • “At the end of the workshop, I will give your table group an opportunity to share their actions with each other.“
  • “When you share, your tablemates will give you an up or down vote (i.e., thumbs up or thumbs down) on each action as feedback on how realistic and actionable it is.”
  • “If you get a majority of ‘up-votes’ from your peers, the action item is approved, and you can count it.”
  • “If you get a majority of ‘down-votes,’ you can still do it, but it won’t count toward a BINGO.  You should put an ‘X’ in the corner of the box.”
  • “If you get five ideas approved in any row, column or diagonal, you will win a PRIZE!”
  • “Rows, columns or diagonals with the Grace Space in them still count.” (Answer any questions about the game.  Remind them to add action items periodically throughout the learning event.  At the end of the event, reserve 30 minutes for them to follow the up-down voting process that you described.  Award prizes for every BINGO that they make.  I recommend saving prize-giving until after the complete review has been done, but you might encourage them to shout “BINGO!!!” whenever they get five in a row.  NOTE: sometimes the same action item can count for multiple BINGOs.  It might count horizontally, vertically and diagonally.)

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