Tag Archives: rock

Samson, Delilah and the Lion (ICEBREAKER)


Time

10 minutes

Description

This fun icebreaker can be an energizing way to get participants going, or you can use it to select people for certain activities.  It’s the familiar game of Rock, Paper, Scissors with a few twists.  This game is not played with just the hands – it’s a full-body activity.  And instead of using Rock, Paper and Scissors, participants act out Samson, Delilah and the Lion.

Scriptures

Judges 13-16 (but particularly 14:5-6 and chapter 16)

Materials

None

Preparation

None

Procedure

Use the following script (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “Who knows how to play ‘Rock, Paper, Scissors?’”  (Even if some people know, you will need to give the full instructions if anyone is unfamiliar with the rules.)
  • “’Rock, Paper, Scissors’ is a fun game of competition.”
  • “Here’s how it works: two people compete to see who can beat the other.”
  • “After counting to three, each person chooses either ‘rock,’ ‘paper’ or ‘scissors.’”
  • “If both players choose the same thing, it’s a tie.”
  • “If players choose differently, then ‘rock’ beats ‘scissors,’ because a rock could break a pair of scissors.”
  • “’Scissors’ beats ‘paper,’ because a pair of scissors could cut the paper.”
  • “’Paper’ beats ‘rock,’ because a piece of paper could cover a rock.”
  • “Does that make sense to everyone?”
  • “’Rock’ beats ‘scissors;’ ‘scissors’ beats ‘paper;’ ‘paper’ beats ‘rock.’”  (If you need to, show them how to play the game with their hands.  Each player counts to three, and on “three” makes the sign for either ‘rock’ (balled fist), ‘scissors’ (separated index and middle fingers – like making “bunny ears”), or ‘paper’ (open hand).  Play a few rounds.)
  • “Now, I want to show you a new way to play.”
  • “Instead of using just your hands, we are going to use your entire bodies, and we’re going to use it to tell part of the story of Samson.”
  • “It works like this: in each round, you can choose to be Samson, Delilah or the Lion.”
  • “If you are Samson, you grunt and make a ‘muscle-man’ pose like this.”  (Demonstrate the pose by flexing your muscles.)
  • “If you are Delilah, you say, “Oooh, la, la,” put your hands on your hips and then shake your hips back and forth.”  (Demonstrate.)
  • “If you are the Lion, you “ROOOOOAAAAAR!’ show your fangs and your claws.”  (Demonstrate.)
  • “Samson beats the Lion; the Lion beats Delilah, and Delilah beats Samson.”
  • “Want to try?”
  • “Okay, everyone find a partner, and stand back-to-back.”
  • “I’m going to count to three.”
  • “When I get to three, both of you should jump around to face the other person and make both the sound and noise for either Samson, Delilah or the Lion.”
  • “ONE – TWO – THREE!”  (Do one or two rounds to make sure they get it.  Then, start eliminating players that lose.  If two players tie (choose the same strategy), both are out.  This will make sure that you always have an even number of people.  If you start with an uneven number of people, you can join the game until you are eliminated.)
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Filed under competition, Delilah, Game, Icebreaker, Samson

Full Body Rock, Paper, Scissors (ICEBREAKER)


Time
10 minutes

Description

This fun icebreaker can be an energizing way to get participants going, or you can use it to select people for certain activities.  It’s the familiar game of Rock, Paper, Scissors with a twist.  This game is not played with just the hands – it’s a full-body activity.

Materials

None

Preparation

None

Procedure

Use the following script (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “Who knows how to play ‘Rock, Paper, Scissors?’”  (Even if some people know, you will need to give the full instructions if anyone is unfamiliar with the rules.)
  • “’Rock, Paper, Scissors’ is a fun game of competition.”
  • “Here’s how it works: two people compete to see who can beat the other.”
  • “After counting to three, each person chooses either ‘rock,’ ‘paper’ or ‘scissors.’”
  • “If both players choose the same thing, it’s a tie.”
  • “If players choose differently, then ‘rock’ beats ‘scissors,’ because a rock could break a pair of scissors.”
  • “’Scissors’ beats ‘paper,’ because a pair of scissors could cut the paper.”
  • “’Paper’ beats ‘rock,’ because a piece of paper could cover a rock.”
  • “Does that make sense to everyone?”
  • “’Rock’ beats ‘scissors;’ ‘scissors’ beats ‘paper;’ ‘paper’ beats ‘rock.’”  (If you need to, show them how to play the game with their hands.  Each player counts to three, and on “three” makes the sign for either ‘rock’ (balled fist), ‘scissors’ (separated index and middle fingers – like making “bunny ears”), or ‘paper’ (open hand).  Play a few rounds.)
  • “Now, I want to show you a new way to play.”
  • “Instead of using just your hands, we are going to use your entire bodies.”
  • “It works like this: you make ‘rock’ by growling and making a ‘muscle-man’ pose like this.”  (Demonstrate the pose by balling your fists, leaning forward, making a partial circle with your arms (hands near waist) and flexing your muscles.)
  • “You make ‘scissors’ by saying ‘SWISH, SWISH, SWISH’ and moving your arms up and down in front of your body like this.”  (Demonstrate.  Your arms should ‘scissor’ each other – one up while the other is down, then passing in the middle and repeating several times.)
  • “You make ‘paper’ by yelling ‘AHHHHHHH!’ and shaking your hands in the air like this.”  (Demonstrate by holding your hands up near your ears on either side of your head and shaking them.)
  • “Want to try?”
  • “Okay, everyone find a partner, and stand back-to-back.”
  • “I’m going to count to three.”
  • “When I get to three, both of you should jump around to face the other person and make both the sound and noise for either ‘rock,’ ‘paper,’ or ‘scissors.’”
  • “ONE – TWO – THREE!”  (Do one or two rounds to make sure they get it.  Then, start eliminating players that lose.  If two players tie (choose the same strategy), both are out.  This will make sure that you always have an even number of people.  If you start with an uneven number of people, you can join the game until you are eliminated.)

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Peter – The Rock


Time

20 minutes (for the lesson – if you do the part about hardening the goo, you will need to bring the “Peter rocks” back to the kids during the next lesson)

Description

This object lesson teaches about Peter both before and after Pentecost. It focuses on his transformation into “the rock.” It’s very tactile and can be quite a bit messy without good supervision, but the kids will really enjoy getting to work with the cornstarch and water mixture.

Materials

  • NOTE: When I originally did this lesson, I found some Styrofoam containers at a restaurant supply store that worked perfectly. They are the type that fast food chains sometimes put hamburgers into and have a top and bottom that fold together to close. Instead of the bowls and measuring cups listed below, you can use these containers to hold the water and the cornstarch (one on each side of the container when it is opened. This way, your measurements are done before the kids arrive, and you don’t need so many measuring cups.)
  • Corn starch (about 4 oz per child – but have extra at the front for children to use to thicken the consistency)
  • Water (about ½ cup – but have extra at the front for children to use to weaken the consistency)
  • Cookie sheets or wax paper for the children to work on
  • Small bowls for each of the children
  • Spoons for stirring the mixture (optional – the children could use their hands)
  • ½ cup measuring cups (one for every two or three children)
  • Drop cloth to go under all the work areas
  • Molds that represent Peter – some ideas are a rock or the letters “P-E-T-E-R.” You can also use a muffin tin.
  • Paper towels and/or a nearby sink for clean up
  • Masking tape and a marker so that you can label the “rocks” with the children’s names while they dry
  • Paints and brushes or markers for decorating the “rocks” after they have hardened
  • (Optional) Ziplock bags for each child if you prefer to let them take their goo home with them.

Preparation

· Lay out the drop cloth under all the areas where the children will be working.

· Divide up the supplies so that each child has the amounts described above.

· Use the masking tape and marker to label the molds or muffin tin spaces so that you’ll know later whose rock is whose.

· Practice the script.


Procedure

Use the following script (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “We’re going to do a fun experiment today that will teach us about Peter and God.”
  • “In front of you, you have some things from a kitchen.” (Hold each up as you describe it.)
  • “You’ve got a cookie sheet (or wax paper), and that’s to keep from making a mess that will be hard to clean up.”
  • “You have a bowl, a spoon, some water, a measuring cup and some powder.”
  • “The powder is called cornstarch.”
  • “We’re going to mix the water and the cornstarch together to make a paste that’s like ‘Peter,’ and we have to do it in the right amounts, so do exactly what I do, okay.”
  • “Pour the cornstarch into the bowl.”
  • “Then, pour in about ½ cup of water.”
  • “Now, use the spoon (or your hands) to mix the cornstarch and the water together.”
  • “When it’s good and mixed, it should ooze like honey. If yours doesn’t, let me know, and I’ll bring you some extra ingredients to help you get it there.” (Add water to soften the paste; add cornstarch to thicken it.)
  • “Now, pour it from your bowl onto the cookie sheet.”
  • “Kind of gooey, right? It just oozes.”
  • “That’s like Simon-Peter before he spent so much time with Jesus.”
  • “You see, Simon-Peter was first called just ‘Simon,’ which means ‘listens and obeys.’”
  • “But Simon wasn’t very good at either of those things.”
  • “When Jesus first met him, He gave Simon the name ‘Peter,’ which means ‘rock.’”
  • “But Peter wasn’t much of a rock, either.”
  • “Jesus gave him the new name, because He wanted Peter to start acting more like a rock.”
  • “A rock is solid. If it’s a big rock, you can’t push it around. It takes a stand and doesn’t move.”
  • “But Peter wasn’t anything like a rock.”
  • “He would take a stand for something, but when it got difficult, he would give up or run away.”
  • “Or maybe we should say, he would ‘ooze’ away like this goo.”
  • “But then one day that we’ve come to call ‘Pentecost,’ Peter was with all the other Apostles waiting in Jerusalem because Jesus had told them to wait there.” (The story is found in Acts 2.)
  • “Jerusalem was full of Jews and people who converted to Judaism from all over the world.”
  • “There were Parthians, Medes, Elamites, Mesopotamians, Judeans, Capadocians, Pontusians, Asians, Phrygians, Pamphylians, Egyptians, Romans, Cretans and Arabs, and they all spoke different languages.”
  • “Suddenly, the Apostles all heard a sound like a rushing wind, and it filled the whole house where they were waiting.”
  • “They looked at each other and saw little tongues of fire on everyone, but it wasn’t the kind of fire that burns.”
  • “All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit, who is the third Person of God, and they began to speak in languages that they didn’t even know.”
  • “They went outside, and people start to look at them in amazement.”
  • “The people could tell that these men were just normal men who lived nearby, so they couldn’t understand how they could speak so many different languages.”
  • “In fact, they spoke all the languages of the people who had come to visit Jerusalem.”
  • “And that’s when it happened! Peter became a rock right there in front of everyone!”
  • “He jumped up where everyone could see him and began to preach to everyone about Jesus.”
  • “He told them to stop sinning and to give their hearts to Jesus.”
  • “He preached so powerfully that 3,000 people became Christians that day!”
  • “And from that day on, Peter was a rock.”
  • “He was no longer afraid of what other people thought about him, and he didn’t run away from anyone. He stood firm!”
  • “I told you that this goo is like Peter. Well it’s like him both before and after he became the rock.”
  • “Try to roll your goo between your hands, and see what happens.”
  • “It hardens up, doesn’t it?”
  • “But let it drip between your fingers, and it turns back into a liquid.”
  • “You see, Peter became the “rock” only when he was in God’s hand.”
  • “When he wasn’t resting in God’s powerful hand, Peter was more like the goo, but when he listened to God and obeyed Him, Peter became the rock!” (Let kids play with the goo for some time, and then say the following.)
  • “Okay, now that we’ve seen what Peter is like, we’re going to harden him up into the “rock” for good just like what happened at Pentecost.”
  • “Pour your Peter goo into these molds (or muffin tins).” (Have each child pour their goo into the mold or tin labeled with his or her name.)
  • “Do you remember what the Apostles saw on each other after they heard the rushing wind?” (Flames of fire)
  • “Right! Well, I’m going to add some fire to our Peter goo, and next time we meet, it will be hardened into a rock.”
  • “You know, what’s true for Peter is true for us, too.”
  • “When we are in God’s hand (meaning that we are trusting God and not just ourselves), we are like a rock. We will have the courage to stand our ground for God.”
  • “But when we try to do things our own way, we leave God’s hand and make a mess.”
  • “So, whenever you are going through a tough time, and you’re feeling gooey, remember to pray to God and ask Him to cover you with His hand.”

Take the goo in the molds/tins and either bake it or put it in the sun until hardened. When you meet with the children again, give them their “Peter Rocks,” and let them decorate them with paint or markers. Ask them questions about the lesson from the previous meeting, and see if they can answer them.

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Filed under Character, Christianity, Daily walk, God's Will, Hands-on, Listening to God, Obedience, Object Lesson, Peter, Science experiment, Simon-Peter, Transformation

In God’s Hands



Time

20 minutes


Description

This object lesson can be a fun way to drive home some lessons about Peter. It’s very messy, so you will want to have a place for the kids to clean up afterward (a garden hose is recommended, because you won’t want to wash large amounts of the baking soda down the drain).

Materials

· Drop cloth for the floor

· Corn starch (1 cup per child)

· Water (1.5 cups per child)

· Plastic cups (2 for each child)

· Bowls (1 for each child)

· Plastic place mat or disposable table cloth

Preparation

Lay down your drop cloth, and set a table with bowls for each child. Measure out the corn starch and water in plastic cups. Have some extra water and cornstarch on hand in case you need to adjust the consistency of the mixture.

Procedure

Use the following script (or modify to suit your needs):

· “Who’s ready to get messy?”

  • “Me, too! Everyone, put yourself in front of one of the bowls on the table.”
  • “In the Bible, the New Testament tells the story about Simon, Andrew’s brother.”
  • “When Simon met Jesus, Jesus changed his name to Peter, which means “rock.”
  • “Simon means “listening and obeying,” but Simon spent too much time talking to listen.”
  • “Jesus gave Simon the name Peter, because He wanted Simon to act like a rock. That means that Jesus wanted Peter to be a leader, who was firm in his convictions and stood strong for the Lord.”
  • “Peter wanted to be a rock for the Lord, but he wasn’t very consistent at that, either.”
  • “But God knows what He is doing. He changed Simon’s name, because He saw who Jesus would help him to be one day.”
  • “It was a reminder of God’s call on Peter’s life. Every time Peter heard his new name, it reminded him that he needed to act like a rock.”
  • “So, that brings us to our experiment. We’re going to make Peter!”
  • “Here’s what we need to do. Take the cup with the powder in it (this is called corn starch) and pour it into your bowl.”
  • “Now, take the cup that has water in it, and pour it into your bowl.”
  • “Mix these together with your fingers – and, yes, it is going to be messy!” (As they mix, the corn starch should turn into a thick liquid. But, it’s not just a liquid. It’s also a solid when you put pressure on it. Check to make sure that all the kids’ mixtures are turning out right. If not, add water to thin or cornstarch to thicken.)
  • “That’s some gooey stuff, isn’t it?”
  • “Let’s try a few things with it. Pick some up in your hand, and quickly roll it into a ball between your hands.” (You may need to demonstrate.)
  • “Now, stop rolling and watch what happens.” (The ball will melt in their hands.)
  • “Weird, huh? Okay, now try tapping on the liquid in the bowl with your finger.’ (Demonstrate if needed. The liquid should harden when you tap it.)
  • “Now, let’s pick it up, and squeeze it in our hands. Then let it go.” (It should go from solid to liquid.)
  • “I told you we were going to make Peter. Peter is like the liquid, and we are playing the part of God.”
  • “You see, Peter was also talking about how he was the best and how he would defend Jesus with his life. But when Jesus was taken by the religious rulers, Peter ran away. Then, he denied that he even knew Jesus three times.”
  • “Whenever Peter acted the way Jesus wanted him to, he was right in the middle of God’s hands. During those times he was solid like a rock.” (Demonstrate by putting some of the liquid in your hand and rolling it into a ball.)
  • “But when things got scary, Peter ran away.” (Allow ball to melt.)
  • “Now, I don’t want to make Peter into a bad guy. He was trying, but he just couldn’t be as strong as he wanted to be.”
  • “And neither can we. None of us are strong enough without God. The best place to be is in the middle of His hand.”

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Filed under Christianity, God's Will, Hands-on, Obedience, Object Lesson, Peter, Simon-Peter, Trust