Tag Archives: engagement

Team Health Tool (DIAGNOSTIC TOOL)


Time

Depends on how deep the discussion goes but at least 15 minutes
Description

This diagnostic tool gives teams a quick way to assess the health of their team in three key areas: Caring (engagement), Closeness (relationships) and Commitment (dedication to the team and its goals).

 

Materials

  • Pens and paper for each person (markers can also be used)

 

Preparation

  • Draw an example of the bar chart to show later.  It can look something like the one below:

Procedure

Use the following script (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “We are going to do a quick assessment that will help you to assess the health of your team and go deep quickly in sharing reasons why it may not be as healthy as it could be.”
  • “This diagnostic tool measures three elements of your team:
    • Caring – which is your personal level of engagement or motivation about the work you are doing together
    • Closeness – which is how you feel about your relationships with your team members
    • Commitment – which is how dedicated you are to staying with the team and supporting the work that you are doing together”
    • “You will assess each of these individually and about how you personally feel.”
    • “Then you will share your assessment with each other and tell why you answered the way you did.”
    • “I would like you to rate each of these three elements on a 1-10 scale.  1 is low; 10 is high.”
    • “And I would like for you to chart it for us so that we can see a visual of how you are feeling.  The chart should look like this…” (Show an example that you have drawn beforehand.)
    • “Okay, go ahead and make your charts.  There are no wrong answers, because you are just putting down how you feel.” (Allow a few minutes for them to make their charts.  Describe the three categories again if you need to.  When they are all done, have them go around the group and individually share their charts.  Ask them to explain each of their answers, and allow the others to ask questions.  However, don’t allow anyone to tell a person that they are wrong for feeling the way that they do.)
    • “It’s important to note that a score of 10 on each of these elements isn’t necessary for all teams to be healthy.  Some teams are fine with lower scores in ‘Closeness,’ for example.  What do you think are healthy scores for your team?” (Allow them to discuss their thoughts on this until they come to an agreement.  Then, ask them to discuss what needs to happen to get the scores to the optimal levels.  Finally, have them create a plan and ask for their commitment to act on it.)
    • “Great work!  You can use this tool anytime you want to do a quick temperature check on your team’s health.  Now that you’ve been through the process once, it should go pretty fast in the future.”

 

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Filed under Assessment, Commitment, Diagnostic Tool, team

Staff Care (DEVOTION)


The Philistines and the Israelites were at a standstill in their war, with one army on each side of a pass.  Jonathan, King Saul’s son, bravely attacked a Philistine outpost with just his armor bearer and with only one sword between them.  This caused a panic in the Philistine camp, allowing the Israelites to rout their enemy.

Saul, in his desire to completely defeat the Philistines, made a hasty rule that none of his men could eat until evening because he wanted them to continue fighting without taking a break.  Jonathan was the first to eat, and as punishment, his father sentenced him to die.

Read 1 Samuel 14:24-48.  Then answer the questions below.

  1. What do you think about Saul’s leadership?
  2. What do you think his men thought about it?
  3. Can you think of a time when an organization you worked for sacrificed the wellbeing of the staff in order to achieve a goal?  What happened?
  4. Why do you think organizations and leaders sometimes put goals above the wellbeing of their staff?
  5. What are the consequences of this approach?
  6. How can we guard against doing this as an organization?

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Filed under Burnout, Devotion, Jonathan, leadership, Management, Motivation

On the Bus (FEEDBACK)


Purpose

This activity helps the facilitator to know the level of commitment participants have for an idea.  It gives participants an opportunity to share their opinion and express their concerns so that the facilitator can speak directly to those issues.

Setup

  • Draw or write the following levels of commitment on cards and place them on the walls around the room.

1.     Still at home

2.     Headed out the door

3.     At the bus stop

4.     Boarding the bus

5.     In my seat and ready to go!

Timing

Explaining the Exercise: 3 minutes.

Activity: 10-15 minutes

Procedure

  • Explain that we are going to do a feedback activity to find out where everyone is at in regard to what you’ve been covering.
  • Point out the signs around the room, and explain the meaning of each one according to the following descriptions:

1.     Still at home – not interested

2.     Headed out the door – open to hearing more

3.     At the bus stop – willing, but need some questions answered

4.     Boarding the bus – willing to go along for the ride

5.     In my seat and ready to go! – fully committed and ready to help make it happen

  • Ask participants to get up and go to stand where they think they are at present with regard to how they feel about the idea, vision, goal or project.
  • When everyone has picked out a spot, ask some of them to explain why they are standing where they are.
  • Then ask them what would help them move from where they are to a more committed place. (These additional insights can be really helpful for uncovering things the group might not have thought of and can be used to clarify certain aspects of the project that people want to do.)

 

 

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Filed under Commitment, Evaluation, Feedback, Group Dynamics