Tag Archives: activity

Joseph’s Journey


For summer camp this year, I’ve written ten Challenges (Bible activities for small groups and a leader to do together – sometimes in competition with other groups) and some large group lessons on the story of Joseph. They are all located on the Lesson and Material Downloads page (see the link at the top of the screen), and you can find them alphabetically in the list. They all start with the letters “JJ” for “Joseph’s Journey.”

Hope you can find some lessons that will be useful for you!

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Abraham, Abundance, acceptance, activity, Agape Love, Annointing, Belief, Bible study, blessing, Challenges, Change, Character, Christianity, Comfort Zone, Coping skills, courage, Discipline, distractions, drama, exercise, faith, Fear, forgiveness, Future, Game, Games that Teach, God's dream, God's favor, God's Plan, God's Will, Hands-on, Healing, heart, Hope, Humility, Jesus, Joseph, Kindness, leadership, Lesson, Listening to God, Love, Obedience, Object Lesson, Overcoming obstacles, Pride, purity, Relationships, Repentance, Salt of the earth, sanctification, spiritual disciplines, Spiritual Growth, Spiritual Health, Spiritual Warfare, Strengths, struggles, team, temptation, territory, test, tool, Transformation, Trust, unconditional love, Waiting on the Lord

Priorities – Mary vs. Martha (DEVOTION)


Read the following Scriptures, and discuss the questions below as a table group.

  • Luke 10:38-42
  • John 11:1-3, 17-44
  • John 12:1-8
  1. Compare and contrast the two sisters.
  2. What is Mary doing that is similar in each of these Scriptures?
  3. What is Martha doing that is similar in each of these Scriptures?
  4. Why do you think Jesus said that Mary’s choice was better in the passage from Luke?
  5. How are you sometimes like Martha?
  6. What is the danger of living our lives like Martha all the time?
  7. What is the best combination of Mary-type priorities and Martha-type priorities for your life?

Leave a comment

Filed under activity, Character, Devotion, Martha, Mary, Priorities, spiritual disciplines, Spiritual Growth, Spiritual Health

Zing, Zang, Zowie! (ICEBREAKER)


Time

10 minutes
Description

This fun icebreaker energizes and adds some silliness to a workshop.  It requires focus and concentration.

Materials

·      None

Preparation

·      None

Procedure

Use the following script (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “Let’s do an icebreaker!”
  • “I need everyone to come stand in a circle.”
  • “Now, place your hands together like this (demonstrate) as if you were about to say a prayer.”
  • “This is your ‘Zinger!’”
  • “You use it to point to someone and say a word.”
  • “There are three words that you must say in the right order; they are ‘Zing,’ ‘Zang,’ and ‘Zowie!’”
  • “Everyone say them with me….’Zing!’….’Zang!’…..’Zowie!’”
  • “Excellent!”
  • “Here’s how this icebreaker is done…I’ll start and point to someone with my Zinger.”
  • “I’ll say, ‘Zing!’”
  • “Then that person has to quickly point to someone and say, ‘Zang!’”
  • “Then that third person has to quickly point to someone and say, ‘Zowie!’”
  • “The fourth person now starts over, quickly points to someone and says, ‘Zing!’”
  • “It’s okay to point right back at the person who pointed to you if you want to try to catch them by surprise.”
  • “This keeps going until one of two things happens:
    • Someone gets confused and says the wrong word (or a correct word in the wrong order).
    • Someone takes too long to respond.”
  • “If either of these two things happens, that person is out, and whoever used their Zinger on them starts off the new round.”
  • “What questions do you have?”  (Answer questions.  Then, begin a round, or have someone else begin it.  Play continues until you are down to two or three people.  Announce them as the winners!)

Leave a comment

Filed under Comfort Zone, competition, Energizer, Facilitation, Fun, Game, Icebreaker, Teaching, Training

Negotiation Game (GAME)


Audience

Children, Teens, Adults

Time

30-40 minutes (longer if you use the Bible study at the end)
Description

This game teaches about negotiation skills and going for win-win.  It has elements of a “Gotcha” activity (an activity where participants are set-up to fail in order to create an awareness of a learning need).  Teams compete with each other and often end up doing worse overall than they could have done if they had cooperated and gone for win-win.

Scriptures

o  Genesis 18:1-33

Materials

o  Flipchart and marker

o  Notecards that say “Win-Win” on one side and “Win-Lose” on the other (one per team)

o  (Optional) Projector, Computer and Screen to display PowerPoint slides with the rules and the debriefing questions.  You can access these by downloading the file “Negotiation Game – Slides” on the Lesson and Material Downloads page at http://www.teachingthem.com.)

o  (Optional) Prizes for the highest-scoring team.

o  Bible

Preparation

o  Write “Win-Win” on one side of each of the notecards.

o  Write “Win-Lose” on the other side of the same notecards.

o  Draw a score chart on the flipchart.  It should look like this (add more columns if you have more teams):

Team #1 Team #2 Team #3 Team #4
WW / WL Points WW / WL Points WW / WL Points WW / WL Points
Round 1
Round 2
Total After 2 Rounds
Round 3
Total After 3 Rounds
Round 4
Total After 4 Rounds
Round 5
Final Score

Procedure

Use the following script (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “Let’s play a game about negotiation.”
  • “In this game, your team will have two choices: go for Win-Win or go for Win-Lose.”
  • “Win-Win means that you want to win but only if the other teams can win, too.”
  • “Win-Lose means that you want to win even if it means that another team might have to lose.”
  • “In a perfect world, we would always go for Win-Win, but this isn’t a perfect world.”
  • “I’m going to give you incentives for going for Win-Lose that will make you have to think hard about what you want to do.”  (Share slides on the PowerPoint if you want to.)
  • “Each round, your team will decide if it wants to go for Win-Win or Win-Lose.”
  • “You will make your decision known by holding up this card.” (Show one of the notecards, and show both sides so that they can see their choices.  Pass out one card to each team.)
  • “If ALL the teams go for Win-Win, the facilitator gives each team 100 points.”
  • “If more than half the teams go for Win-Lose, the facilitator takes away 100 points from every team.”
  • “But if less than half the teams go for Win-Lose, the facilitator gives the Win-Lose teams 200 points and takes away100 points from the Win-Win teams.”
  • “We will play five rounds.”
  • “Each team should now select a Negotiator.”
  • “This person will meet with the Negotiators from the other teams before each round and have three minutes to come to an agreement about what strategy to take.”  (Allow teams to select a Negotiator.  This person will have to be the Negotiator for the entire game.)
  • “What questions do you have before we start to play?”  (Answer questions.  Then, give the Negotiators time to meet outside the room for three minutes.  Afterward, have them come back to their teams.  On the count of three, have the Negotiator on each team raise their card with the side that has their choice (Win-Win or Win-Lose) facing you.  Record these choices on the flipchart, and assign scores to each team.  Then, allow 5 minutes for the team to discuss changes to their strategy before starting the process over again and sending the Negotiators outside the room.  Run all five founds.  If everyone is choosing Win-Win, you can add pressure by doubling the point amounts for a particular round.  When you’ve finished the game, award a prize for the highest scoring team if you want and have the teams discuss the Debriefing Questions below (and also on the 2nd PowerPoint slide.)

Debriefing Questions

• What makes the win-win strategy difficult?

• What are the problems with the win-lose strategy?

• How should we handle it when we are going for win-win, and someone takes advantage of us?

• Why should we strive for the win-win strategy?

Idea for Bible Lesson

If you want to do this game is connection with a Bible lesson, try having participants read Genesis 18 and answer the following questions:

1.    What did Abraham do before the negotiation that helped make it successful?

2.    What did Abraham do during the negotiation that helped make it successful?

3.    Was Abraham going for Win-Win or something else?  Why do you think so?

4.    Why do you think Abraham stopped at ten?

5.    Could he have gotten the Lord to agree to a lower number?  Why do you think so?

6.    What practices of good negotiation can you use in your negotiations?

Leave a comment

Filed under Abraham, Abram, competition, Game, Games that Teach, Intercession, Negotiation

Name That Christmas Carol (ACTIVITY)


Time

15-20 minutes

Description

This is a fun activity to play during Christmastime.  Participants try to guess familiar Christmas carols from the complicated synonyms on the worksheet.

Scriptures

  • None

Materials

  • Worksheet (attached)
  • Something for each participant to write with

Preparation

  • Print copies of the worksheet (one per participant or one per team)
  • Practice the script.

Procedure

Use the following script and instructions (or modify to suit your needs):

o  “Let’s do a Christmas activity!”

o  “Get out your Thesaurus, or this could get ugly.”  (Hand out worksheets and writing utensils to each participant or team.)

o  “Try to determine what Christmas Carol is represented by the strange synonyms.”

o  “I have the answers in case you get stumped.”  (All participants or teams to work on the puzzles for 10-15 minutes.   Then share the answers with them.  You can make this a competition if you like.)

Answers:

1.  White Christmas; 2.  Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire; 3.  All I Want for Christmas is My Two Front Teeth; 4.  O Holy Night; 5.  It Came Upon a Midnight Clear; 6.  O Come, All Ye Faithful; 7.  Away in a Manger; 8.  Deck the Hall; 9.  Little Drummer Boy; 10. We Three Kings; 11. Silent Night; 12. God Rest Ye, Merry Gentlemen; 13. Santa Claus is Coming to Town; 14. Let it Snow; 15. Go, Tell It on the Mountain; 16. Rudolph, the Red-nosed Reindeer; 17. What Child is This?; 18. Joy to the World; 19. Hark! The Herald Angels Sing; 20. The Twelve Days of Christmas

Name That Christmas Carol

1.     Bleached Yule

2.     Castaneous-colored Seed Vesicated in a Conflagration

3.     Singular Yearning for the Twin Anterior Incisors

4.     Righteous Darkness

5.     Arrival Time 2400 hrs – Weather Cloudless

6.     Loyal Followers Advance

7.     Far Off in a Feeder

8.     Array the Corridor

9.     Bantam Male Percussionist

10.  Monarchial Triad

11.  Nocturnal Noiselessness

12.  Jehovah Deactivate Blithe Chevaliers

13.  Red Man En Route to Borough

14.  Frozen Precipitation Commence

15.  Proceed and Enlighten on the Pinnacle

16.  The Quadruped with the Vermillion Proboscis

17.  Query Regarding Identity of Descendant

18.  Delight for this Planet

19.  Give Attention to the Melodious Celestial Beings

20.  The Dozen Festive 24 Hour Intervals

(S – “Kitty’s Daily Mews” kittysdailymews-subscribe@topica.com)

Leave a comment

Filed under Christianity, Christmas, Game, Icebreaker

Full Body Rock, Paper, Scissors (ICEBREAKER)


Time
10 minutes

Description

This fun icebreaker can be an energizing way to get participants going, or you can use it to select people for certain activities.  It’s the familiar game of Rock, Paper, Scissors with a twist.  This game is not played with just the hands – it’s a full-body activity.

Materials

None

Preparation

None

Procedure

Use the following script (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “Who knows how to play ‘Rock, Paper, Scissors?’”  (Even if some people know, you will need to give the full instructions if anyone is unfamiliar with the rules.)
  • “’Rock, Paper, Scissors’ is a fun game of competition.”
  • “Here’s how it works: two people compete to see who can beat the other.”
  • “After counting to three, each person chooses either ‘rock,’ ‘paper’ or ‘scissors.’”
  • “If both players choose the same thing, it’s a tie.”
  • “If players choose differently, then ‘rock’ beats ‘scissors,’ because a rock could break a pair of scissors.”
  • “’Scissors’ beats ‘paper,’ because a pair of scissors could cut the paper.”
  • “’Paper’ beats ‘rock,’ because a piece of paper could cover a rock.”
  • “Does that make sense to everyone?”
  • “’Rock’ beats ‘scissors;’ ‘scissors’ beats ‘paper;’ ‘paper’ beats ‘rock.’”  (If you need to, show them how to play the game with their hands.  Each player counts to three, and on “three” makes the sign for either ‘rock’ (balled fist), ‘scissors’ (separated index and middle fingers – like making “bunny ears”), or ‘paper’ (open hand).  Play a few rounds.)
  • “Now, I want to show you a new way to play.”
  • “Instead of using just your hands, we are going to use your entire bodies.”
  • “It works like this: you make ‘rock’ by growling and making a ‘muscle-man’ pose like this.”  (Demonstrate the pose by balling your fists, leaning forward, making a partial circle with your arms (hands near waist) and flexing your muscles.)
  • “You make ‘scissors’ by saying ‘SWISH, SWISH, SWISH’ and moving your arms up and down in front of your body like this.”  (Demonstrate.  Your arms should ‘scissor’ each other – one up while the other is down, then passing in the middle and repeating several times.)
  • “You make ‘paper’ by yelling ‘AHHHHHHH!’ and shaking your hands in the air like this.”  (Demonstrate by holding your hands up near your ears on either side of your head and shaking them.)
  • “Want to try?”
  • “Okay, everyone find a partner, and stand back-to-back.”
  • “I’m going to count to three.”
  • “When I get to three, both of you should jump around to face the other person and make both the sound and noise for either ‘rock,’ ‘paper,’ or ‘scissors.’”
  • “ONE – TWO – THREE!”  (Do one or two rounds to make sure they get it.  Then, start eliminating players that lose.  If two players tie (choose the same strategy), both are out.  This will make sure that you always have an even number of people.  If you start with an uneven number of people, you can join the game until you are eliminated.)

Leave a comment

Filed under Game

Outer Zebox (ICEBREAKER)


Time
25-40 minutes (depending upon group size)

Description

This fun icebreaker can be an energizing way to get participants thinking out of the box.

Materials

o  Flipchart paper (several sheets for each group)

o  Markers (different colors to allow for creativity)

o  Masking tape to hang flipcharts

o  Prizes for the winners (optional)

Preparation

None

Procedure

Use the following script (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “We are going to do an activity to help us think out of the box.”
  • “It will get us ready for some possibility thinking.”
  • “Before we begin, I need to separate you into teams.”  (Separate participants into groups using whatever sorting technique you like.  Group size should be about 6-8 people.  Once they are sorted, read the following few paragraphs.  You might want to ask someone with artistic abilities to draw the planet and its characteristics as you tell the story.)
  • “Each group represents a team of scientists who has discovered intelligent life on two planets in a distant galaxy.  The planets are called Inner Zebox and Outer Zebox.”
  • “Your deep space probe has returned findings that have led you to believe that Inner Zebox is a dying planet.”  The atmosphere is stale and toxic and limits the thinking abilities of those who live there to safe, comfortable and uninspired ideas.
  • “Outer Zebox, however, is flourishing!  The atmosphere there is crisp and full of energy, and it gives those living there the ability to think new, innovative and exciting ideas.”
  • “You are a little surprised that life is flourishing on Outer Zebox, because conditions on the planet are quite unusual.”
  • “For example, it has three suns.”
  • “It spins five times faster than the rotation of the earth.”
  • “Strong winds on the planet blow straight up from the surface.”
  • “And the planet is located right in the middle of an asteroid belt, where it receives meteor showers three times a day.”
  • “Your government is very excited (and a little worried) at the idea that another planet has intelligent life, and they have asked you to draw a sketch of the type of being you are likely to meet when you make contact.”
  • “In your groups, discuss and then draw the intelligent life form that would flourish on this planet.”
  • “Your probe has not yet returned photographs, so you will have to make some educated guesses about what it looks like and what it is able to do.”
  • “Use the data you’ve collected about its environment to help you imagine this new life form.”
  • “You have fifteen (15) minutes to complete your drawings.”  (After groups have finished their drawings, have them hang them up on the wall.  Then have each group do a short presentation about their life form.  After all the presentations, invite the participants to vote on the creature that is the most “Outer Zebox” (innovative and most likely to flourish on the planet) by putting a single dot in the corner of the drawing they like best with a marker.  Award a prize if you wish.)

Leave a comment

Filed under creativity, innovation, thinking