Monthly Archives: December 2012

Wreck-It Ralph (MOVIE MENTORING)


Wreck It RalphAudience

Children

Time

3 hours
Description

Wreck-It Ralph is a movie from Disney about a video game villain who wants to be a hero.  It deals with themes of diversity, judgment, bullying and self-acceptance.  It can be a good way to teach children how to appreciate the differences in the others around them.

 

Scriptures

These Scriptures speak to some of the themes of the movie.  Read one or more to give a biblical basis for the teaching.

  • Micah 6:8 (do justice, love kindness, walk humbly)
  • Matthew 7:1-5 (do not judge; remove the plank in your own eye first)
  • Matthew 7:12 (do to others as you would have them do to you)
  • Mark 12:31 (love your neighbor as yourself)
  • 1 Peter 3:8-9 (love one another, be compassionate and humble, repay evil with a blessing)

 

Materials

o  Copy of the movie

o  Equipment for showing the movie (TV, DVD player, LCD projector, Speakers, Screen…)

o  Question Sheet (attached)

o  Popcorn and drinks (optional)

 

Preparation

o  Print out copies of the question sheet for each individual or group.

o  Set up everything for viewing the movie.  (Be sure to test it all out to make sure that the movie plays well and that the sound can be heard by everyone.)

o  Prepare snacks. (optional)

 

Procedure

Watch the movie.  Then on your own, with a mentor or with a group, answer the questions on the Question Sheet.

 

Question Sheet

 

  1. Why didn’t the townspeople let Ralph live with them or participate in their activities?
  2. Are there people in our own community who get treated like Ralph?  Why or why not?
  3. How do you think the townspeople should have treated Ralph?
  4. In the “Bad-anon” meeting, the video game villains said that you can’t change if you’re a bad guy.  Do you think this is true?  Why or why not?
  5. Do you think Ralph had a good reason for wanting to earn a medal?  Why or why not?
  6. How do you feel about the way all the other racers treated Vanellope (“the Glitch”)?
  7. What is similar about Vanellope and Ralph?
  8. How did the thing that made them different from everyone else become the greatest strengths for Ralph and Vanellope?
  9. What did the townspeople and the other racers learn about how to treat someone who is different?
  10. How should we treat people in our lives who are different from everyone else?

 

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Filed under acceptance, Agape Love, Bullying, diversity, Judgment, Justice, Kindness, Love, Movie, Relationships

Life of Pi, The (MOVIE MENTORING)


Life of PiAudience

Teens, Adults

Time

3 hours
Description

The Life of Pi is the story of an Indian man, his search for God and his masculine maturity.  He experiences a tragic shipwreck, in which all his family members are eventually killed.  Afterward, he spends months at sea with a tiger, which represents the wildness of a man that needs to be controlled to achieve maturity.  Without controlling this part of their masculinity, men become destructive, abusive adults seeking selfish pursuits and pleasures that hurt those around them.

 

Scriptures

These Scriptures speak to some of the themes of the movie.

  • Psalm 34:4-7 (God delivers us from all our fears)

 

Materials

o  Copy of the movie

o  Equipment for showing the movie (TV, DVD player, LCD projector, Speakers, Screen…)

o  Question Sheet (attached)

o  Popcorn and drinks (optional)

Preparation

o  Print out copies of the question sheet for each individual or group.

o  Set up everything for viewing the movie.  (Be sure to test it all out to make sure that the movie plays well and that the sound can be heard by everyone.)

o  Prepare snacks. (optional)

 

Procedure

Watch the movie.  Then on your own, with a mentor or with a group, answer the questions on the Question Sheet.

 

Question Sheet

 

  1. Who did each of the animals on the boat (i.e., the hyena, the orangutan, the zebra and the tiger) represent?
  2. Why do you think it was important for Pi to associate people with animals in his story?
  3. What part of Pi’s personality or identity did the tiger represent?
  4. Why didn’t Pi let the tiger die when he had a chance to let it drown?
  5. What did Pi mean (metaphorically) when he said that the tiger couldn’t be tamed, but it could be trained?
  6. Why was it important for Pi to face the tiger (metaphorically)?
  7. What did the island represent?
  8. Why was it important for Pi to leave the island?
  9. Why was Pi so sad when the tiger left him without a goodbye?

10. Where do you think the “tiger” went (metaphorically)?

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Filed under Adversity, faith, Hardship, Masculinity, Movie, Religion, Trust

Taste Test (DEMO)


LuakAudience

Teens, Adults

Time

10 minutes
Description

This demonstration uses a fake coffee taste test (between Nescafe and Kopi Luak) to make the point that expectations are higher for our customers when we ask them to invest more.  This can be used to talk about meeting customer expectations.

 

Scriptures

  • Matthew 21:18-20 (Jesus’ disappointment with the fig tree that wasn’t bearing fruit in season)
  • John 2:6-10 (The head of ceremonies’ delight at the unexpected surprise of the best wine served last.)
  • Revelation 3:15-16 (Jesus’ disappointment with the church of Laodicea for being lukewarm)

 

Materials

  • Two cups (optional – one ordinary and one elegant)
  • Two spoons (optional – one plastic and one nicer)
  • Hot water (possibly in a pitcher or carafe)
  • Instant coffee (enough for two cups)
  • Copy paper (one sheet, cut in half)
  • Marker
  • Table
  • Optional – other ways to make a distinction between the two cups of coffee (i.e., a doily or handkerchief, a mint or chocolate, etc.)

Preparation

  • Label one half-sheet of paper, “Nescafe.”
  • Label the other half-sheet of paper, “Kopi Luak.”
  • Put the same instant coffee in each of the cups.
  • Prepare your hot water so that it will be ready (and still hot when you do the demo).
  • Set your table with the cups of coffee, and label each with one of the two signs.
  • Decorate the table however you like to make a distinction between the two cups of coffee.

 

Procedure

Use the following script (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “I would like to do a taste test, and I need a volunteer who knows the difference between a regular cup of coffee and an exceptional cup of coffee.”  (Ask a volunteer to come to the front, and then direct your questions to him or her.)
  • “Have you ever heard of a type of coffee called ‘Kopi Luak?’”  (Acknowledge response.  Whether or not the volunteer is familiar with the coffee, you will need to explain for the audience.)
  • “Kopi Luak is a coffee that originates from Indonesia.”
  • “It is said by some that it is the best coffee in the world.”
  • “Kopi Luak means ‘coffee Luak.’”
  • “A luak (pictured above) is a type of cat that lives in Indonesia and eats a large amount of coffee beans.”
  • “After the cat digests the coffee beans and passes them as waste, workers harvest the beans for the Kopi Luak coffee.”  (Ask your volunteer is he/she still wants to be your volunteer for this taste test.  Keep it light, but find another volunteer if this one no longer wants to participate.)
  • “There is something about the acids in the digestive system of the cat that make the coffee beans especially good and flavorful.”
  • “As you can imagine, you have to pay a high price for drinking coffee that has been through a cat’s digestive system!”
  • “A single, small cup of Kopi Luak coffee often sells for over $10 USD.”
  • “I would like to see if this famous coffee is as good as they say, so I’ve brought some in for this taste test.”  (Pour the hot water, and stir your two cups of coffee.)
  • “On the left, I have a normal cup of Nescafe.”
  • “On the right, I have a cup of Kopi Luak.” (Now, address the volunteer again.)
  • “Would you please take a sip of each cup of coffee and let us know what you think of the difference?”  (Have the volunteer describe the difference.  There is a potential here that the volunteer may think there is a difference in taste because you have built up the ‘Kopi Luak’ coffee so much.  If so, try not to embarrass him/her by pointing out that both cups are really just Nescafe.  Focus more on whether or not the volunteer thinks the difference is really worth the difference in price.)
  • “How much would you be willing to pay for the cup of coffee on the left?”  (Allow volunteer to respond.)
  • “And how much would you be willing to pay for a cup of the Kopi Luak?” (Allow volunteer to respond.  Hopefully, the difference in what the volunteer is willing to pay is not as dramatic as the price difference you described.)
  • “It doesn’t taste like the difference between a $1 and a $10 cup of coffee, does it?”
  • “When you pay $10 for a cup of coffee, you expect something spectacular and life-changing!”
  • “It’s disappointing when something is built up and doesn’t deliver on the promises made about it.”
  • “But what if I told you that I was playing a bit of a trick and that both coffee cups have nothing more than Nescafe in them?”  (Acknowledge volunteer’s response, and keep it light to prevent embarrassing him or her.  Then thank the volunteer and let him/her take a seat.)
  • “It’s even worse, isn’t it, when I promise something so different and remarkable but really just repackage the same old, ordinary stuff?”
  • “It’s even more disappointing than if I had told you from the beginning that they were the same.”
  • “There is a lesson in this about how we deal with our customers.”
  • “It’s much better to under-promise and over-deliver than to over-promise and under-deliver.”  (If you want to go deeper with this lesson, have the participants read through the three Scriptures at the top of this lesson and discuss the Debrief Questions below.)

 

Debrief Questions

  1. Why was Jesus so upset in the first two Scriptures?
  2. Why was the master of the banquet so delighted?
  3. How does this apply to how we deal with our customers?
  4. What should we strive to do?

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Filed under Customer Service, Expectations, Revelation, Service

Customer Expectations (DEVOTION)


Customer SatisfactionAudience

Teens, Adults

 

Time

30 minutes
Description

This devotion explores how expectations impact satisfaction levels.  This can be used to talk about meeting customer expectations.

 

Scriptures

  • Matthew 21:18-20 (Jesus’ disappointment with the fig tree that wasn’t bearing fruit in season)
  • John 2:6-10 (The head of ceremonies’ delight at the unexpected surprise of the best wine served last.)
  • Revelation 3:15-16 (Jesus’ disappointment with the church of Laodicea for being lukewarm)

 

Materials

  • None

Preparation

  • None

 

Procedure

  • Have participants work in groups and read the passages mentioned above.
  • Then, have them answer the Debrief Questions below.

 

Debrief Questions

  1. Why was Jesus so upset in the first two Scriptures?
  2. Why was the master of the banquet so delighted?
  3. How does this apply to how we deal with our customers?
  4. What should we strive to do?

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8 Elements of Good Training Design (BIBLICAL CASE STUDY)


4MAT  Wheel 2Time

20 minutes
Description

This Biblical case study uses Bernice McCarthy’s 4MAT model to explore the teaching styles of Jesus.  Use it after you have taught about 4MAT’s eight wedges.

 

Scriptures

  • See the chart below.

 

Materials

  • Chart on the following page (1 copy per person or group)

 

Preparation

  • Print out copies of the chart and distribute them to all the participants.

 

Procedure

Use the following script (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “In your groups, discuss each of the following situations, and decide which of the eight elements it corresponds to.”
  • “It’s possible that there will be more than one answer.” (Have groups work together to select the elements.  Allow 20 minutes for group work.  Then share the recommended answers below.  These answers are not definitive.  If there is disagreement, discuss it as a group and come to agreement based on the best evidence.)

 


Recommended Answers

  1. Extend, Improve
  2. Connect
  3. Preview, Inform
  4. Preview, Inform
  5. Practice, Extend
  6. Connect
  7. Practice, Extend
  8. Preview, Inform
  9. Preview, Inform
  10. Practice
  11. Practice
  12. Practice
  13. Practice
  14. Preview
  15. Practice
  16. Connect
  17. Discuss, Inform
  18. Inform
  19. Practice
  20. Practice
  21. Extend
  22. Inform
  23. Connect, Discuss, Preview, Inform
  24. Perform
  25. Discuss, Preview, Inform
  26. Inform, Extend
  27. Extend, Improve
  28. Perform
  29. Improve, Perform


 

8 Elements of Good Training Design

 

As a group, think about the following things that Jesus did as He prepared His disciples to lead the Church.  Consider His time on earth to be like a very long workshop.  How do each of His actions match up to the eight elements of good training design. (Some actions have more than one answer.)

 

What Jesus Did

Scripture

Connect Discuss Preview Inform Practice Extend Improve Perform
1. Listened to teachers in Temple and asked them questions Luke 2:41-50

2. Turned water into wine John 2:1-11

3. Talked with Nicodemus John 3-1-21

4. Talked with the woman at the well John 4:5-26

5. Invited Peter, Andrew, James & John to follow Him Mark 1:16-20

6. Performed healings and other miracles Various

7. Appointed some disciples as Apostles Mark 3:13-19

8. Gave the Sermon on the Mount Matthew 5-7

9. Taught in parables Various

10. Slept in the boat during the storm Mark 4:35-41

11. Sent out the 12 Luke 9:1-6

12. Asked the disciples to feed the 5,000 John 6:4-13

13. Allowed Peter to walk on water Matthew 14:24-33

14. Said, “I am the Bread of Life.” John 6:35

15. Asked the disciples who people said He was Matthew 16:13-20

16. Let Peter, James and John witness the Transfiguration Mark 9:2-8

17. Debriefed the Transfiguration as they came down the mountain Matthew 17:9-13

18. Talked with Peter about paying the Temple tax Matthew 17:24-27

19. Allowed the disciples to argue about who was the greatest Mark 9:33-35

20. Sent the 70 out in pairs to visit towns Luke 10:1-16

21. Debriefed the 70 when they returned Luke 10:17-24

22. Discussed how to inherit eternal life with the expert in the law Luke 10:25-37

23. Spent time with Mary and Martha Luke 10:38-42

24. Allows Mary to anoint him for burial Mark 14:3

25. Debriefs the anointing Mark 14:4-9

26. Met with men on the road to Emmaus Luke 24:13-32

27. Asked Peter to feed His sheep John 21:1-25

28. Gave the “Great Commission” Matthew 28:16-20

29. Sent the Holy Spirit at Pentecost Acts 2:1-13

 

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Only One Left (DEVOTION)


Bowling - One StandingAs a group, read the following Scriptures and answer the questions below.

1 Kings 18:22 (“I am the only one left.”)

1 Kings 19 (entire chapter – Elijah despairs)

1.    How often did Elijah say that he was “the only one left?”

2.    Why did he feel so alone?

3.    How do you know that he wasn’t ever really alone?

4.    How did God help Elijah?

5.    Why is it important to have fellowship with other believers when we go through stressful times?

6.    How can you protect yourself from despair during times of trial and stress?

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Filed under Devotion, Elijah, Stress, Trial

Jacob’s Family (BIBLE LESSON)


DanTime

30 minutes
Description

This Bible Lesson teaches about Jacob and his family and focuses on the meaning of the names given to each of his children.  It is a good introduction to the story of Joseph.

 

Scriptures

  • Genesis 29-30, 35

 

Materials

  • Optional – You can use the slides that I’ve created for this lesson. They are all funny pictures of me (or one of my children) posing as each of the different characters.  The file is located at www.teachingthem.com on the Lesson and Material Downloads page.  It is named, “Jacob’s Family – Pictures.”

 

Preparation

  • Practice the script.

 

Procedure

Use the following script (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “I would like to tell you about Jacob and his family.”
  • “It’s a story from the book of Genesis.”
  • “Jacob got into trouble with his twin brother, Esau (another good story for another day!).”
  • “Esau was so mad he wanted to kill Jacob, and Jacob’s mom thought it would be a good idea to send him to live with her brother and his family.”  (Show slide with the map of Canaan.)
  • “Jacob traveled far from his home to a place called Haran, where his uncle Laban lived.” (Advance slide to show the arrow that leads from Canaan to Haran.)
  • “When he arrived, he met his cousin, Rachel, and fell madly in love with her.”
  • “He agreed to work for Laban for seven years to earn the right to marry his daughter, but at the end of that time, Laban tricked Jacob and made him marry his older daughter, Leah, instead.”
  • “Leah wasn’t as pretty as Rachel, so Laban was afraid she wouldn’t be able to find a husband if he didn’t trick Jacob into marrying her.”
  • “Jacob was really mad, but Laban agreed to let him marry Rachel, too, if he would work for him for seven more years.”
  • “Jacob agreed and married Rachel the following week.”
  • “He kept his promise to work for Laban another seven years and then continued working for him for another six, because Laban kept tricking him and changing his wages.”
  • “But even though Laban was dishonest with Jacob, God blessed Jacob with a large family during the time that he worked for his uncle.”
  • “Jacob had twelve sons and a daughter during that time.”
  • “But it wasn’t exactly a happy family.”
  • “The Bible teaches that we should only marry one person.”
  • “Jacob married two, and they were sisters.”
  • “And these sisters were competitive!”
  • “Jacob didn’t really love Leah.”
  • “He had been tricked into marrying her, but Rachel was his true love.”
  • “Because Leah was unloved, God blessed her with children.”
  • “Her first child was a son, which was a big blessing during those times.”
  • “Sons were preferred because they could do hard work and earn money to support their families.”
  • “Leah named this first son Reuben, which means, ‘Look! It’s a boy!’”  (Show slide.)
  • “Names were pretty important to the Hebrew people.”
  • “When people knew the meaning of your name, they knew something about you or about what was going on when you were born.”
  • “Leah was so excited that she had a boy, she celebrated with his name.”
  • “When she named him, she told those who were with her that God had been compassionate to her during her painful loneliness and that she hoped now her husband would love her.”
  • “But even though Leah brought a great blessing to the family, Jacob still didn’t love her.”
  • “So God blessed her again, and she had another son.” (Show slide.)
  • “This one she named Simeon, which means, ‘God heard.’”
  • “Leah knew that God had heard her prayers for another son, and she believed that Jacob would love her now.”
  • “But he didn’t.”
  • “So, God blessed her with a third son, and she named him Levi, which means, ‘Connect.’” (Show slide.)
  • “The desire of Leah’s heart was to connect with her husband, but he still didn’t love her.”
  • “So God gave her another son, and she named him Judah, which means, ‘Praise God!’” (Show slide.)
  • “Four boys made her one of the most blessed women in all the land, so she rightfully gave God praise for his blessings on her life.”
  • “Remember I told you that these sisters were competitive?”
  • “Rachel wasn’t able to have children of her own, and she was getting madder and madder every time Leah gave birth to a boy.”
  • “She said to Jacob, ‘I’ll die if you don’t give me children!’”
  • “And so she came up with a plan.”
  • “Since she couldn’t have children of her own, she gave her servant, Bilhah, to Jacob.”
  • “The custom in that land was that if your servant had children with your husband, those children were counted as your own children.”
  • “God blessed Bilhah, and she had a boy.” (Show slide.)
  • “Rachel named him Dan, which means, ‘Vindication!’”
  • “Vindication means, ‘to be justified or cleared of guilt.’”
  • “Back then, if you couldn’t have children, people thought it was because God didn’t love you.”
  • “Now Rachel felt that she was justified by God and that He had proven His love for her with the birth of Dan.”
  • “Because she had some catching up to do, Rachel gave Bilhah to Jacob again, and Bilhah got pregnant a second time.” (Show slide.)
  • “She gave birth to another boy, and Rachel named him Naphtali, which means, ‘Fight!’”
  • “Rachel said, ‘I’ve had to wrestle with my own sister and with God, and I’ve won!’”
  • “Now, Leah started to get worried.”
  • “She wasn’t having any children of her own, so she gave her maid, Zilpah, to Jacob, too.”
  • “Zilpah got pregnant and had a boy.” (Show slide.)
  • “Leah named the boy Gad, which means, ‘Lucky,’ because she felt so lucky to have five boys!”
  • “Leah gave Zilpah to Jacob again, and Zilpah had another boy.” (Show slide.)
  • “Leah named him Asher, which means, ‘Happy,’ because she was so happy to have six boys!”
  • “One day after this, Reuben (Leah’s oldest son) was digging and found some mandrakes, which have a root that looks a little like a person.”
  • “People used to believe that it had special powers to make women pregnant, so Rachel asked Leah if she could have it.”
  • “Leah didn’t want to share it.”
  • “She was unhappy because Jacob never spent time with her anymore.  He only spent time with Rachel.”
  • “Leah agreed to share the mandrake if Rachel would tell Jacob to spend time with her, so Rachel did it.”
  • “So, Leah got pregnant again and had a seventh son.” (Show slide.)
  • “She named him Issachar, which means, ‘Bartered,’ because she traded the mandrake with her sister so that she could spend time with Jacob.”
  • “Then, Leah had another son, and she named him Zebulun, which means, ‘Honor.’” (Show slide.)
  • “Leah hoped that Jacob would now honor her as his wife, since she had given him eight sons.”
  • “God blessed her one more time after that, and she had a daughter, whom she named Dinah.” (Show slide.)
  • “Dinah means, ‘Justified,’ which is a lot like the name Rachel gave to Bilhah’s first son, Dan.”
  • “Leah felt that eight sons and a daughter justified her as Jacob’s wife.”
  • “After that, God heard the prayers of Rachel and gave her a son of her own.”  (Show slide.)
  • “Rachel named him Joseph, which means, ‘Add.’”
  • “She said, ‘God has taken away my shame.  May he add to me another son.’”
  • “Because Joseph was the first son of Rachel, the wife Jacob loved, Joseph was his father’s favorite and could do no wrong.”
  • “Jacob finally got away from Laban after that and went to live back near his home in Canaan.”
  • “There Rachel gave him another son.” (Show slide.)
  • “But Rachel was much older now, and her body struggled through the labor.”
  • “In the end, it was too much for her.”
  • “As the boy was born, Rachel knew she was dying.”
  • “When they asked her what she wanted to name the boy, she said, ‘Ben-Oni,’ which means, ‘Son of my pain.’”
  • “Then, she died, and Jacob buried her with much grief.”
  • “A name is an important thing for a Hebrew.”
  • “It says a lot about you.”
  • “How do you think Ben-Oni would feel growing up with a name that means ‘Son of my pain?’”
  • “Everyone would know he caused his parents deep pain.”
  • “They would know (because people talk) that his mother died giving birth to him.”
  • “And every time his father, his siblings, a friend, a teacher or anyone else called his name, he would be reminded that his birth killed his mother.”
  • “Jacob couldn’t let that happen, so he changed Ben-Oni’s name to Ben-jamin, which means, ‘Son of Good Fortune.’” (Advance slide.)
  • “What an act of grace and kindness!”
  • “Instead of having a name linked with his mother’s pain and death, Benjamin had a name that reflected his father’s deep gratitude to God for giving him another child.”
  • “Maybe people have tried to give you a name like Ben-Oni’s, a name that constantly reminds you that you’re not good enough, that people don’t want you, that you’re not loved.”
  • “It may be a terrible nickname you are teased with, or it might be words like, “Worthless!’ ‘Unwanted,’ ‘Accident,’ ‘Mistake,’ ‘Screw-up,’ or ‘Failure.”
  • “I’m here to tell you that your Father in heaven would never use that name or that label to refer to you.”
  • “Your Father in heaven doesn’t think you are a mistake or an accident or a screw-up or a failure.”
  • “He thinks you are an incredible, wonderful blessing!”
  • “He loves you immensely, and there is nothing you can do that would ever make Him love you any less.”
  • “To your Father in heaven, you will always be the child of His good fortune!”

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Filed under Future, Jacob, Joseph, Purpose