Monthly Archives: April 2012

Samlo! Tuk Tuk! Songthaew! (ICEBREAKER)


Time

10 minutes
Description

This fun icebreaker is based on three types of public transportation in Thailand:

  • Samlo (“three wheels”) is a rickshaw. Pronounced: “sawm-low” (long “o”)
  • Tuk Tuk (the sound the vehicle makes) is a three-wheeled motorcycle taxi.  Pronounced: “took took”
  • Songthaew (“two rows”) is a pickup truck with two rows of covered benches in the back.  Pronounced: “song-tow” (“tow” as in the first part of “towel”)

This icebreaker energizes and adds some silliness to a workshop.  Because the words are unfamiliar and a little challenging to remember, it requires focus and concentration.

Materials

·      Print out the pictures of the vehicles in the file called, “Samlo, Tuk Tuk, Songthaew – Photos.pptx”  You can download it on the Lesson and Material Downloads page at http://www.teachingthem.com.

Preparation

·      None

Procedure

Use the following script (or modify to suit your needs):

  • “Let’s do an icebreaker!”
  • “I need everyone to come stand in a circle.”
  • “Now, place your hands together like this (demonstrate) as if you were about to say a prayer.”
  • “This is your ‘Zinger!’”
  • “You use it to point to someone and say a word.”
  • “There are three words that you must say in the right order, and they describe three types of public transportation in Thailand.”
  • “The three types of transportation are ‘Samlo,’ which is a rickshaw; ‘Tuk Tuk,’ which is a three-wheeled motorcycle taxi; and ‘Songthaew,’ which is a pickup truck with two rows of covered benches in the back.”
  • “So, the three transportations again are: ‘Samlo,’ ‘Tuk Tuk,’ and ‘Songthaew.’”
  • “Everyone say them with me….‘Samlo!’….‘Tuk Tuk!’….‘Songthaew!’” (You may want to practice this several times so that they are familiar with the words.)
  • “Excellent!”
  • “Here’s how this icebreaker is done…I’ll start and point to someone with my Zinger.”
  • “I’ll say, ‘Samlo!’”
  • “Then that person has to quickly point to someone and say, ‘Tuk Tuk!’”
  • “Then that third person has to quickly point to someone and say, ‘Songthaew!’”
  • “The fourth person now starts over, quickly points to someone and says, ‘Samlo!’”
  • “It’s okay to point right back at the person who pointed to you if you want to try to catch them by surprise.”
  • “This keeps going until one of two things happens:
    • Someone gets confused and says the wrong word (or a correct word in the wrong order).
    • Someone takes too long to respond.”
    • “If either of these two things happens, that person is out, and whoever used their Zinger on them starts off the new round.”
    • “What questions do you have?”  (Answer questions.  Then, begin a round, or have someone else begin it.  Play continues until you are down to two or three people.  Announce them as the winners!)
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Filed under Energizer, Game, Icebreaker

Conflict and Anger (DEVOTION)


In your table groups, read the following Scriptures, and discuss the questions that follow:

  • Mark 11:25
  • Luke 6:27-36
  • Romans 12:14-21
  • 1 Corinthians 13:4-7
  • Ephesians 4:26-27

What themes do you notice from these Scriptures?

 

Is it okay to be upset with someone?  What conditions does God place on anger?

 

How are we to act towards our enemies?  Why do you think this is so?

 

Read the parable of the Unmerciful Servant in Matthew 18:21-35.  Consider that this Scripture is most likely about forgiving a Christian brother or sister (notice that Peter asks about forgiving “my brother,” that Jesus is making a comparison to the “kingdom of heaven” and that the other man is referred to as a “fellow servant.”).  If that’s true, what is Jesus saying about forgiveness?  (Hint: the jail cannot be hell, and the torture cannot be eternal in hell if this is about believers.)

 

 

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Filed under Anger, conflict management, Conflict Resolution, Devotion, forgiveness

Conflict Escalation – David (BIBLICAL CASE STUDY)


Read the story of David’s war with his son Absalom in 2 Samuel and try to determine the events that relate to the Five Stages of Escalating Conflict.  When you think you have them all identified (hint: some occur multiple times), draw a graph on a flip chart, and label it with these events to show the 5 Stages.

The Scriptures you will want to focus on are: 2 Samuel 13:1-39; 14:21-33; 15:1-17; 18:1-17

 Environment

  • Conditions for conflict exist, but neither party has acted on them.
  • One side may even be unaware of the potential conflict even though the other side is resentful.

Eruption

  • A triggering event (or events) leads to escalation of the conflict by adding fuel to the fire.

Escalation

  • Intensified behaviors include demands, threats, ultimatums and open expressions of hostility.
  • Polarization occurs as people pick sides.
  • Opponents are dehumanized to make it easier to see them as the enemy, and selective perception filters out evidence that might justify opponents’ behaviors.
  • Fighting generates new grievances, sometimes becoming new triggering events.
  • Goals often change as initial solutions no longer satisfy.
  • Unresolved old issues are revived.

Endurance

  • Sides “dig in” for prolonged conflict.
  • Compromise seen as a sign of weakness.

End Point

  • Stalemate occurs as sides run out of resources, support or energy to continue.
  • Realization occurs that cost of conflict outweighs benefits of winning.
  • One side achieves a lasting victory.

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Filed under Biblical Case Study, conflict management, Conflict Resolution, David, Devotion, Relationships

Conflict Escalation – Samson (BIBLICAL CASE STUDY)


Read the story of Samson in Judges 14-16, and try to determine the events that relate to the Five Stages of Escalating Conflict.  When you think you have them all identified (hint: some occur multiple times), draw a graph on a flip chart, and label it with these events to show the Five Stages.

Environment

  • Conditions for conflict exist, but neither party has acted on them.
  • One side may even be unaware of the potential conflict even though the other side is resentful.

Eruption

  • A triggering event (or events) leads to escalation of the conflict by adding fuel to the fire.

Escalation

  • Intensified behaviors include demands, threats, ultimatums and open expressions of hostility.
  • Polarization occurs as people pick sides.
  • Opponents are dehumanized to make it easier to see them as the enemy, and selective perception filters out evidence that might justify opponents’ behaviors.
  • Fighting generates new grievances, sometimes becoming new triggering events.
  • Goals often change as initial solutions no longer satisfy.
  • Unresolved old issues are revived.

Endurance

  • Sides “dig in” for prolonged conflict.
  • Compromise seen as a sign of weakness.

End Point

  • Stalemate occurs as sides run out of resources, support or energy to continue.
  • Realization occurs that cost of conflict outweighs benefits of winning.
  • One side achieves a lasting victory.

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Filed under Biblical Case Study, conflict management, Conflict Resolution, Relationships, Samson

Conflict Among Believers (DEVOTION)


In your table groups, read the following Scriptures, and discuss the questions that follow:

  • Matthew 7:3-5
  • Matthew 5:23-24
  • Matthew 18:15-17
  • Luke 17:3-5
  • John 13:34-35
  • 1 Corinthians 6:1-8
  • Ephesians 4:1-3
  • Colossians 3:12-14

What do these Scriptures have in common?

Whose responsibility is it to take initiative toward reconciliation?  When does this apply?

How would you describe God’s view on conflict within the Body of believers?

Why does God want believers to be reconciled to one another?

What are some general principles you can take away from these Scriptures?

 

 

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Filed under Body of Christ, conflict management, Conflict Resolution, Devotion, forgiveness, Relationships

Staff Care (DEVOTION)


The Philistines and the Israelites were at a standstill in their war, with one army on each side of a pass.  Jonathan, King Saul’s son, bravely attacked a Philistine outpost with just his armor bearer and with only one sword between them.  This caused a panic in the Philistine camp, allowing the Israelites to rout their enemy.

Saul, in his desire to completely defeat the Philistines, made a hasty rule that none of his men could eat until evening because he wanted them to continue fighting without taking a break.  Jonathan was the first to eat, and as punishment, his father sentenced him to die.

Read 1 Samuel 14:24-48.  Then answer the questions below.

  1. What do you think about Saul’s leadership?
  2. What do you think his men thought about it?
  3. Can you think of a time when an organization you worked for sacrificed the wellbeing of the staff in order to achieve a goal?  What happened?
  4. Why do you think organizations and leaders sometimes put goals above the wellbeing of their staff?
  5. What are the consequences of this approach?
  6. How can we guard against doing this as an organization?

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Filed under Burnout, Devotion, Jonathan, leadership, Management, Motivation

I’ve Done Something (ICEBREAKER)


 

Time

10-15 minutes (depending upon group size)


Description

This icebreaker can be used as a meeting opener.  It works particularly well for groups that already know each other fairly well and will help them to understand something new about each person.

 

Materials

None

 

Preparation

None

Procedure

·       Explain to group that everyone is going to participate in an icebreaker.

·       Introduce yourself first using the criteria described below so that they can see how it’s done.

·       Have each person introduce himself/herself (basic info – name, time with company, time in leadership, functional area….) and then state something they have done that they think no one else in the class has done.

·       If someone else has also done it, the same participant must state something else until he/she finds something that no one else has done.

·       Proceed to the next person until everyone has had a chance to introduce himself/herself.

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Filed under Icebreaker, Pride, Relationships, Training